Month: July 2018

New Pulp United!

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SUBMISSIONS OPEN FOR FIRST IN NEW ANNUAL ANTHOLOGY TO DEBUT IN 2019- ‘NEW PULP UNITED VOLUME ONE’ TO BENEFIT CREATORS IN NEED

Pro Se Productions, a publisher of Genre Fiction, is also a publisher and a leading figure in one aspect of what is considered The New Pulp Movement. This movement focuses on fiction that is inspired and in the style of Pulp Fiction published in the early 20th Century, influenced by Pulp of the past, but written by modern writers with an eye toward the future. New Pulp exists outside this movement, obviously, and many recognize all aspects of this style of fiction as a community. This feeling has been so prevalent in the past that it has led to creators coming together to produce benefit books in memory of other creators or, in the case of Pro Se’s Editor in Chief, Tommy Hancock, to assist during hard times.

“LEGENDS OF NEW PULP FICTION,” says Hancock, “was a project put together by Jaime Ramos and Ron Fortier and Rob Davis of Airship 27 Productions. Over 100 creators threw their talents into the mix to put together the biggest volume of modern Pulp ever to help me after I was diagnosed with a rare form of Congestive Heart Failure. It was the single biggest outpouring of support I have seen in a long time in publishing, especially within New Pulp. And I will personally be forever grateful for it.”

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New Pulp Author Sean Taylor noted this very thing recently in

a post on social media, expressing concern about growing divides between writers today, due to politics and different world views. In this post, Taylor made a call to return to the sense of community that existed when collections were done for Hancock or when Pro Se produced “WHEN THE SHADOW SEES THE SUN”, a collection of essays about creatives and depression in honor of Logan Masterson, a writer who lost his battle with depression. Taylor’s post caused many creators to think, including Hancock.

“We don’t expect,” says Hancock, “to replicate LEGENDS or any other collections with what Pro Se plans to do, but the course of discussion Sean started this past week demands that we do something, at least it demands it of me. That’s why Pro Se Productions is now taking submissions for what will hopefully be the first of a yearly collection entitled NEW PULP UNITED! All proceeds from this collection will go into a fund that is aimed at supporting New Pulp creators when there are medical issues or emergency situations beyond normal limitations. A committee will be formed that will oversee the distribution of funds. A website and Facebook page will be established prior to the release of the first volume with more details concerning how a creator may request funds.

“Any creator, be they writer, artist, or editor that wants to contribute can submit a story,” explains Hancock, “to NEW PULP UNITED! With all money made going into the NPU fund, no royalties will be paid and Pro Se will absorb costs that we usually cover with royalties as well. Length of individual stories does not matter, only that the tales are some sort of largely unpublished Genre Fiction with an aim at adventure, action, thrills, and/or suspense. Previously published tales will be considered, but the collection should be more new material than anything else. Also, artists wishing to contribute can provide spot illustrations for stories. Editors wanting to help can also participate. All anyone who wants to be a part of this has to do is email me at editorinchief@prose-press.com. Writers need to send me a few lines about what they intend to write and/or submit, and if the story is good and meets Pro Se’s standards, it’s in.”

NEW PULP UNITED! Is currently slated for publication in March 2019, and if subsequent volumes occur, they will be published in March of each year. This collection WILL ONLY go to print if the number of stories reaches a minimum of 30,000 words. There is no maximum limit. For a story to appear in the first collection, writers MUST email Hancock to show intent to participate and the final work needs to be emailed to submissions@prose-press.com no later than November 1, 2018.

Hancock says, “I know people will immediately have questions about how the money will be distributed, how it will be determined who is considered a New Pulp creator, and such things. To that end, all sales figures and earnings on this collection and subsequent volumes will be made public. As to who qualifies as a New Pulp writer, that will in part be up to the Committee to determine and guidelines will be set up to oversee that, although the intent here is to help, not to create a bureaucratic, complicated process. Right now, the focus has to be on seeing if the first collection even makes. If it doesn’t, it does not necessarily mean that there is a divide in the community. It may also indicate, though, that maybe there isn’t a community at all. Either way, Pro Se wants to help its creators and those outside our company who are why New Pulp exists today. This is a small way, but it is our way.”

For more information on this submissions call, please contact Hancock at editorinchief@prose-press.com.

To learn more about Pro Se Productions, go to http://www.prose-press.com. Like Pro Se on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ProSeProductions

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Kickin’ The Willy Bobo With…NICOLE GIVENS KURTZ

Derrick Ferguson: We’ve been through this before but no doubt there’s a lot of people who will be reading this who don’t know a thing about you so: Who Is Nicole Givens Kurtz? Where do you live and what do you do to keep the bill collectors away?

Nicole Givens Kurtz: I am originally from Knoxville, Tennessee (Go Big ORANGE!), but I currently reside just outside of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. I’m a public-school teacher by day, a writer at night and a mother 24/7.

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DF: It’s been a year and four months since I last interviewed you. What have you been doing since then?

NGK: So much has happened in the last year! An anthology I submitted a story to, was named as a Bram® Stoker Finalist in Horror Anthology (Sycorax’s Daughters), I’ve sold a few short stories, and finished a new urban fantasy series that I’m currently shopping around. I’ve also had the pleasure of attending BlackTasticon in June and some other pretty amazing events this year.

DF: I asked you in our last interview if there was an audience for Nicole Kurtz. Have you found your audience yet? Or have they found you?

NGK: Alas, my audience remains a bit elusive. I’m still working on refining my author brand, and also increasing my in-person presence. I write a lot of different types of stories, and for that reason, it may be difficult for me to find an audience that are “Nicole Givens Kurtz” fans, but rather they like specific things I write. For example, I do have “Cybil Lewis” readers, and “Minister Knight” readers, etc.

DF: How is Mocha Memoirs Press doing?

NGK: Mocha Memoirs is going through an overhaul in terms of direction. It’s not entirely new, but we are refining our model. Publishing is always changings and we’re shifting with the sands, too.

Our tagline is Bold. Fearless. Fiction. We want to continue to amplify marginalized voices in speculative fiction. We opened our submissions doors two months ago and are actively seeking novellas and novel-length submissions.

DF: What are you working on now?

NGK: Currently, I’m revising a romance novella for Falstaff Crush, the romance line of Falstaff books.  After that, I plan to finish revisions on my second urban fantasy series.  There are short stories and short story collections I’m also putting together, including on for Cybil Lewis and my weird western short stories.

DF: Who is Cybil Lewis?

NGK: Cybil Lewis is a private inspector in the future who investigates violations (crimes) for those who are afraid or don’t want to go to the police. She’s like a female Shaft in dystopian Washington, D.C., following her own moral compass, and getting the job done.  She’s by far my most personal and favorite character out of all of those that I have created over the last 20 years.

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DF: In the year since we’ve talked, has the prominence of female African-American Speculative Fiction writers grown? Diminished? Stayed the same?

NGK: It has exploded in the year since we talked! There are so many African-American Speculative Fictions writers that I struggle to keep up and to read others’ works! There’s just so much and that’s not a complaint! It’s so encouraging that younger African-American girls and boys and read books in speculative fiction with protagonists that look like them. They’re the heroes and heroines, the super powered people in those stories and that is beautiful.

DF: How do you see your role in the community of female AASF writers? IS there a community of female AASF writers? And if not, why isn’t there one?

NGK: There’s a community of AASF writers, but I don’t belong to an “official” one. I have a solid group of AASF authors who support each other, work together to network and share ideas, and push each other to be great. It’s something African Americans have always done, especially black women. We’ve taken care of things when we need to and for the community. Over the years, I have found and been gifted with really intelligent and brilliant AASF who may be further down the road in their career than me, but who reach back and mentor. Linda Addison does this as well as Tananarive Due and others.

DF: Who should we be reading these days? Who are you reading?

NGK: Right now, I’m reading Daniel Jose Older, Tomi Adeyemi’s, Eden Royce, and Sherrilyn Kenyon.  Everyone should be reading and supporting independent authors! My currently reading list has independently published authors on them, and honestly, I met some amazing authors at Blacktasticon. If you’re into comics, you should read Robert Jeffery’s Route One, and William Satterwhites’ Stealth.  There’s so much good reading being put out by small presses and independently published authors.

DF: How was Blacktasticon 2018? How much fun did you have?

NGK: Blacktasticon 2018 was a warm hug! It was mind-blowing, stimulating, and a huge creative bump for me. I did have to pinch myself several times as I sat on panels with my writing heroes. Sheree Renee Thomas, Linda Addison, John Jennings are the stars of black speculative fiction and I couldn’t believe how generous they were with their time, with their knowledge, and that was what really made the event for me. This community of individuals coming together to talk about speculative fiction through the lenses of Afro-centric beliefs, ideals, and historic context. I learned so much. My soul was fed. No other convention does that in the way that Blackstasticon did.

DF: For someone who hasn’t read any of your work, what should they start with and why?

NGK: For those who haven’t read any of my work, I would start with SILENCED, the first Cybil Lewis novel. It’s such a great story, and it’s a pretty good example of the types of stories I tend to tell. Of course, my writing has changed a lot over the years, but that’s the best representation of my writing style.

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DF: Where can people find out more about you and your work?

NGK: People can find me at Other Worlds Pulp, which is my website: http://www.nicolegivenskurtz.com, on Twitter at @nicolegkurtz or a facebook at https://www.facebook.com/NicoleGKurtz

DF: Anything else we need to know?

NGK: I’m giving away a free copy of my Cybil Lewis short story, “Recruited,” when people sign up for my newsletter. Interested parties can go here: https://nicolegivenskurtz.com/newsletter/

Thank you, Derrick for the interview. It is always a pleasure.

Sean E. Ali Double Downs On VEGAS HEIST

From the “Viva, Lost Vegas” File…

Like the artwork?

Nah, it’s not a job I’m on, this was just me doodling on my down time inspired by something I read recently.

Occasionally the grind of life gets you down, you’ve gotten in a rut, and it seems like all you do is go do your job so you can go home and wait to go do your job and then go home and…

Well, you get the idea.

Then, out of the blue, you get a call from a guy you know who wants to get together and he can invite you and a couple of other guys out for a trip so wild…

…it’s criminal.

Which is why it helps that the destination that this guy has in mind is…

…Las Vegas.

This is really one of those times where you’re gonna want what happens in Vegas to stay in Vegas. In fact, this situation takes place in the early days of the Strip in 1965, so it’s possible this is the thing that happened that stayed where it happened in the first place.

Which is a breezy primer for Van Allen Plexico’s fun little crime tale VEGAS HEIST.

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Now, as I’ve said before: I love heist stories and their second cousins caper stories. Give me a crew of thieves with an eyes bigger than their stomachs crime on the schedule with seemingly impossible obstacles and toss in a couple of twists and I’m good. Toss in some of that classic Sinatra/Rat Pack “Ocean’s 11” and mix liberally with nods to other characters of that era in crime fiction and I’m not only in, I want a window seat. So Mr. Plexico is swinging in the right direction for me right out the gate.

So let’s break down the plot just a little. We start with John Harper, who is in the middle of putting his foot down on a loose end from a job he pulled prior to the start of our story: an associate who feels his take should’ve been bigger. Roughly Harper’s share of that job bigger. Harper disagreed with that assessment of the situation…

…rather forcefully.

As this exchange is going on, Harper gets a call from another associate whom he’s had a more positive relationship with: Saul “Salsa” Salzman, an attorney who occasionally moonlights as a heister, a roper, and an inside man who fingers potential jobs based on keeping his eyes and ears open and seeing an opportunity when it presents itself. Salsa’s got a lead on a job and it would require a first rate planner to work out the angles. Harper agrees to a meet, and gets back to what he was doing. Later, and in as neutral a locale as you can find, Salsa drops the caper on Harper: he’s got enough inside information on a mark that he wants Harper’s help to pull off a heist…

…in Las Vegas.

He has a crew: Bobby Donovan, an old school “jugger” (safecracker) who has been knocking knobs off of safes long enough to be considered one of the best. Besides being their vault man, Donovan also has a way to bankroll and arm themselves for the job without being on the line to another party who’d take a cut as his pay back on the vig, or the principal investment, plus the juice in the form of interest. There’s a catch, but nothing he, Harper and Salsa can’t handle. Plus Donovan brings with him Brett Rooker, a former boxer and wrestler who hires out now as muscle to crews who need it for a cut of the take. Rooker asks few questions, keeps himself to himself to a degree, but he’s hitched up with Salsa’s caper because of the notoriety of this particular crew’s individual reputations.

After they secure their money and weapons, the crew hits the road and move on to Vegas.

And they have a plan to break the bank while they’re there.

Now, I’ll stop there because it was really hard not to spoil the bits of business above with more details, but let’s get down to cases. VEGAS HEIST is a story you’ve seen, heard, read, probably even wrote at some point. It’s a little bit of Sinatra’s “Ocean’s 11”, it’s a little Richard Stark’s Parker, it’s all been done, yes, that too.

However…

…it’s all about execution that lets you know if you’ve got a hack job or really nice piece with the flavor and feel of a nice 1960s era crime flick with enough twists and turns in all the right places. Van hits the latter over the former, VEGAS HEIST is just a lot of fun. It’s a departure from Van’s usual bailiwick of superhero action adventure and space operas, but he really stepped into this genre with an obvious affection for it. If this continues on as a series of stories, I’m going to assume his characters will be fleshed out a bit more. Not too much, I don’t need an origin story or two, but it’ll be nice to see them develop past their obvious inspirational sources into distinct characters with unique voices. Still the way Van wrote these guys you get some subtle insights into how they see the world around them like Salsa’s gregarious nature having him presume that Harper’s a friend, while when he writes Harper’s point of view, Salsa’s more like a reliable associate he can trust not to stab him in the back. Plus, the other characters involved in the plot do have specific and distinct places in the narrative and the action.

And the twists, Lordy lord the twists in this tale are so much fun to see play out. There were plenty of places where I figured out the twist early but then Van would toss in something I took my eye off of and do something you kind of saw coming…

…but not like that.

Folks, Van kind of nails it.

So, VEGAS HEIST was a lot of fun for me, so much so, I decided to fool around with a what if scenario and make up one of those old house style ad like pieces that might’ve made it into a magazine or a movie marquee if HEIST got that kind of traction.

So, if you’re so inclined, check out VEGAS HEIST. I picked up a copy for my Kindle app right HERE.

Available in ebook and hard copy. Sadly we don’t get a movie version, but hey never say never…

Oh yeah, from left to right at the bottom of the image you’ve got Donovan, Rooker, Harper and Salsa…

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…because much was made of Salsa’s hat in his initial visual description…

Until next time…

…Be good to yourselves and each other.

 

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