Kickin’ The Willy Bobo With…MARK BOUSQUET

Derrick Ferguson: We haven’t done one of these in years so we have to get the obligatory introductory stuff outta the way: Who is Mark Bousquet and why are you being interviewed here?

Mark Bousquet:  I was tempted to go back and grab whatever I wrote for an introduction to the last time we did that and just paste it here, but I suppose that would be cheating, eh? Who I am is a writer. Why I’m being interviewed here is because I’m a published writer.

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As we do this interview in mid-2019, I’ve recently relaunched my Gunfighter Gothic series in six new shiny editions, and just released THE MASKS OF SATURDAY MORNING, which is the first Spooky Lemon Mystery.

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DF: Where do you live and what do you do to keep yourself in cheese and crackers?

MB: I’m as Assistant Teaching Professor at Syracuse University, teaching writing. Not the fun writing that we’re gonna talk about in this interview, but the obligatory writing classes that students are forced to take. I try to make it fun and try to open up the student’s eyes as to what “writing” is: it’s not just the 5-paragraph research or opinion essays they likely got burned out on in high school. I try to give them assignments that have them create visual projects like comic books or infographics and “beyond writing” projects like podcasts and documentaries, where writing is a tool to get you to the end product.

I’ve recently moved to Scranton, Pennsylvania, so I’ll be looking at a 2-hour commute to and from work this fall. That sounds rough, but the nice thing about teaching college is that I’ll be able to work from home 2 or 3 days each week.

DF: How’s Darwin doing these days? What is he up to?

MB: Darwin is still going strong. He’s 12 and a half years old now, and while he can be an old man inside, he’s still his old energetic puppy dog self when we’re outside. Moving to a new city means everything is new to him and he loves little more than going someplace new. We’ve got a nice public park that we walk in most mornings that always gets his day started right.

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DF: You’re still writing but it seems as if your output has decreased. Why is that?

MB: A combination of factors. My current job is way more intensive than my previous jobs, so there’s less time to write, and I found that when I made time to sit down, the stories just weren’t flowing like they used to. Some of that was because the job was leaving my brain extra tired, but it was also because I didn’t know who I was as a writer, anymore. I got myself into trouble by creating series instead of stand-alone stories and so even in creating something new, I was adding another brick onto my back, committing me to writing some future project. I needed to take some time to clear the decks and while that’s an ongoing process, I feel good about putting an editing shine to the Gunfighter Gothic books.

I’ll write more Gunfighter Gothic stories but it’s also good, as is. I haven’t left anyone hanging. I need to do the same for ADVENTURES OF THE FIVE and STUFFED ANIMALS FOR HIRE, two kids’ series that each have 2 books published but need to have a third to close those stories off.

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DF: In what direction do you see your writing career going?

MB:  A greater balance between writing things that I’ll publish through Space Buggy Press and submissions to outside presses. I like having the control over a project that Space Buggy affords me, but I also like to be challenged by trying to write for different editors and publications.

DF: You wrote some of the best movie reviews I’ve ever read. Why did you stop? And are you ever going to start writing them again?

MB: Thank you, that’s very kind of you to say! I stopped because it was taking up too much of my writing time. When I was really cranking out the reviews, I was living in a new city, with only a few friends, no social life to speak of, and no car. I spent most of my time between walking Darwin and working. I didn’t have cable. I was doing Netflix by mail. So I had enough time to write creatively and write reviews and do some travel writing, but as the workload increased, as I bought a car, and entered into a fantastic relationship, there just wasn’t the time to produce the same amount of words. Something had to give and it was writing reviews. I don’t think I’ll ever go back to writing them full-time, but I still love talking about movies and TV shows.

DF: Speaking of movies, what are some of your favorite movies you’ve seen in 2019 so far?

MB:  With the move, I haven’t watched as many movies this year as I normally do and I don’t have any lesser-known gems to herald. In fact, looking at the Top 50 films of 2019 through mid-July, I’ve only seen seven of them: “Avengers: Endgame” (loved it), “Captain Marvel” (liked it), “John Wick 3” (liked it), “Shazam” (blah), “Godzilla: King of Monsters” (loved it), “Alita: Battle Angel” (awful), and “Fighting with My Family” (pleasant enough).

I have spent more time reading for fun this year than I have in recent years. I’ve just worked through a run of Robert Parker (Pale Kings and Princes), Ace Atkins (The Redeemers), Clive Cussler (The Chase), Ace Atkins writing as Robert Parker (Lullaby), and I’m currently reading Jo Nesbo’s The Devil’s Star.

These were not random choices. Between February and a week or so ago, I binged all 20 seasons of “Midsomer Murders”, which is the kind of detective show that’s cozy instead of hard-boiled. I got the idea that I wanted to write a cozy mystery set in Middle Earth but as I started to develop that idea, I realized that I already had a main cozy character in Spooky Lemon. I also had a novel finished that had been sitting on my computer for years. When I started self-publishing, I let too many books out too quickly but in recent years, I’ve held on to them too long, tinkering endlessly with them.

I decided to get Spooky out and work on that as my cozy and then take that other character and keep it in a fantasy setting, but write it more like a crime novel than a cozy mystery. I devoured the Robert Parker Spenser books as a teenager, so I started there and reread Pale Kings and Princes (I chose it for the simple fact that it was the oldest Spenser book my local library had on the shelves). Then I read Ace Atkins’ The Redeemers because I knew he’d written a bunch of Spenser novels. Then I took The Chase off of my shelf to read Clive Cussler’s historical pulp before coming to Lullaby, to see how Atkins adapted his style to Parker’s Spenser universe. And now I’m reading Nesbo, for a touch of non-American crime.

I noticed several things that have helped inform me about my current WIP. For instance, in the Spenser novels, the focus is always on Spenser. Atkins doesn’t put that weight on Quinn Colson, and in Redeemers, he spends nearly as much time with the bad guys as he does his main character. Cussler spends the bulk of his time with Isaac Bell, but isn’t afraid to leave him out of chapters and spend time with the bad guys and (to a lesser extent) secondary characters. Atkins’ Spenser book is written in the Parker mold — in other words, it’s not Ace Atkins’ take on Spenser, it’s Atkins channeling Parker’s take.

Who to spend time with is a critical decision because it will inform what kind of crime book you’re writing. In the Colson and Bell stories, there is no mystery, at all. We know who the bad guys are. And the main characters quickly figure out who the bad guys are, too. They might not have all the pieces to the puzzle, but they can see what the puzzle is gonna look like when it’s finished. They aren’t mysteries, at all. They’re pursuits. (With a healthy dash of subplots about the protagonists’ personal lives thrown in, too.) With the Spenser stories, there is a mystery to solve, but the emphasis isn’t on solving the crime nearly as much as it is simply hanging out with Spenser and Hawk and Susan. There’s a case to solve, but I’m always amazed how much time is devoted to following Spenser doing ordinary things: making dinner, sitting in his car on a stakeout, talking with Susan, driving around Boston.

The treatment of the protagonists’ masculinity was also telling. Spenser is completely comfortable with who he is. Colson knows who he is, but isn’t entirely comfortable with it. Isaac Bell is almost comically old school masculine. Nesbo’s Harry Hole is an emotional and physical wreck.

The same goes for the style of prose: Parker is quick and light. Cussler drowns in historical detail. Nesbo is as much literary as he is case-focused. Atkins sits somewhere in the middle, writing a contemporary western inside William Faulkner’s South.

With all this swirling in my head, I sat down to bring my character to life. All I really had was an idea for an opening scene. I knew how the scene would start (“A number of years ago, a green-skinned man walked out of the Wilds to stand before the King.”) and I knew how it would end (“The green man said, ‘I want to be a cop.'”). But that was it. I didn’t know what else would happen and I didn’t know what kind of story he would be in, but I kinda thought I wanted to do a “fantasy western.” But I wasn’t sure.

So I sat down and churned out 2,500 words to find out. I lost the character’s cozy first name (Aldous) and gained a more western name (Bridger). I came up with a basic plot. I gave him deputies and a witch for a pathologist. I built him a world to work in that’s more Scandinavian than Deadwood. I think I know that I want to write a crime story that’s more mystery than pursuit, but I also want to spend time away from the main character.

I think.

But that’s what the first draft is for, ain’t it?

DF: What are you working on now?

MB: The Sheriff Bridger Skunk fantasy crime book is where I’m living at the laptop most, but I’m also plotting out the second Spooky Lemon mystery in journals and working through the details of the long-promised World War II book, BLACK RHINOS.

DF: Can we expect to see more of AMERICAN HERCULES?

MB: Yes, but not as the stand-alone episodes that I published last time. I’ll finish off the modern spin on Hercules’ labors as individual episodes, but I’ll just release them all in one collection instead of dropping them one at a time.

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DF: Do you have any more children’s books planned?

MB:  I’ve been trying to write the follow-up to THE BEAR AT THE TOP OF THE STAIRS for a good two years and can’t seem to settle on a story that I like, so that’s back-burnered at the moment. I would like to get one kids book out in time for Christmas, but whether it will be the sequel to BEAR or an ADVENTURES OF THE FIVE book or STUFFED ANIMALS FOR HIRE book, I can’t say. I’m hoping one of those stories grabs me and demands to be written.

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DF: What can we expect to see from Mark Bousquet in 2019?

MB: I don’t know if I’ll have another novel published this year, but I’ll be writing like mad behind the scenes.

I’d like to do more travel writing, too, but even working on 4 – 6 hours of sleep a night, there’s only so much time in the day.

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DF: What’s a typical Day In The Life of Mark Bousquet like?

MB: I used to be the kind of writer who did his best work between midnight and 4 AM, but now my best work seems to come in the 6 AM to Whenever I Take Darwin For a Walk AM or late afternoon. So, it’s usually get up around 6, write, go for a hike with Darwin, breakfast, work stuff, lunch work stuff, errands, reading or writing, dinner, reading or writing, and spend as much time with the partner as possible.

That’ll change once the fall semester starts up again, but for now, I’ve got time to write and I’m taking advantage of it.

Derrick Ferguson: Anything else we need to know?

Mark Bousquet: ‘ve got a website at themarkbousquet.com where people can sign up for my free newsletters: one for my kids work and another for my genre work. Signing up for each of them gets people a free digital novel as thanks.

I think that covers it! Thanks, Derrick!

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Kickin The Willy Bobo With…LUCAS GARRETT

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Derrick Ferguson: It has been a really long time since we’ve done this so we have to bring folks up to speed. Let’s start off with The Basics: Who is Lucas Garrett? Where do you live and what do you do to keep the bill collectors away?

Lucas Garrett: I am a 40-year-old Marine Corps veteran with over twenty years of experience in the security industry, and one year of experience in building engineering. I currently reside in the Lawrenceville, Georgia area where I have lived for close to 9 years. I am a security professional working in the Midtown Atlanta area for a notable security company for the last 8 years.

My personal interests include all things pulp fiction (anything considered Classic Pulp and New Pulp), superhero comic books and movies, action flicks. I am an Afrofunk, Steamfunk, and Cyberfunk book collector. I highly recommend Dark Universe by Milton Davis and Gene Peterson.

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I love cutting edge science fiction books like “Killing Time” and “The Labyrinth Key,” television showsFringe” “Eureka” and “Warehouse 13” and movies like “Dark City”, “The Thirteenth Floor” and “The Matrix.”

I’m a fan of Tokusatsu series like Go Go Sentai Boukenger and Kamen Rider Black, and I love Mecha and mature anime series like Mobile Suit Gundam 0079, Guyver, and Golgo 13.

Most importantly, I look for crossovers found in various forms of literature, television shows, movies, cartoons, anime, and video games.

DF: You are an astoundingly knowledgeable and enthusiastic fan of Comic Books/Movies/Science Fiction/Classic Pulp/New Pulp/The Wold Newton Universe. How did your interest in all things fun and fantastic come from?

LG: My love of reading goes back to the sixth grade when I read Isaac Asimov’s “The Foundation”. That book did a lot to open my eyes to the imaginative worlds of literature and possible sciences on the horizon.

And I also had my love of superhero and action comics like Ron Fortier’s and Jeff Butler’s The Green Hornet comic book series for the now defunct NOW Comics line, as well as “Classic XMen” that reprinted old issues from Uncanny X-Men for Marvel Comics.

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I still remember when Nick Fury disbanded S.H.I.E.L.D. and Steve Rogers became Captain America again back in the late 1980s. And I remember when Bruce Wayne met Tim Drake after the tragic events of Death In The Family that saw the apparent death of Jason Todd and his mother at the hands of The Joker around the same time.

All of these characters and their stories helped to shaped my young mind.

And by the time Chris Claremont and Jim Lee revamped the X-Men in 1991 that many have come to remember and revere, I was all in.

And in 1992, I was introduced to Black Panther, the Warrior King of Wakanda, and member of The Avengers, when I saw his profile on one of the Marvel Comics trading cards my brothers and I collected in the early 1990s. And I found my hero. King of the most technologically advanced society on Earth in the Marvel 616 Universe. Yes, I was definitely all in.

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And I stayed in for 18 years.

I took my first hiatus from mainstream superhero comics around the time Jeph Loeb’s Ultimatum concluded, and came back in 2010, for six years, with the release of Cable and X-Force. My current hiatus is in response to Nick Spencer’s Steve Rogers Captain America #1 and Ta Nehisi Coates run on Black Panther. You don’t make Steve Rogers a member of Hydra and you don’t turn Wakanda into Rwanda. Two big no-no’s in my book.

Now I just keep up with the latest shenanigans and story-arcs that are “so original and so edgy” from online articles that I read, and whatever praise or rants my friends post on Facebook and Instagram.

Nevertheless, there are three books that I consider required reading, and I highly recommend finding, if you want to understand the evolution of superhero comics: Marvels by Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross, Kingdom Come by Mark Waid and Alex Ross, and Planetary by Warren Ellis and John Cassaday.

And it was around the time of the release of Planetary that I realized that there was more to the modern mythology I had been reading and watching. There were stories yet to be uncovered that led to the creation of the stories I grew to love.

And as time went by, I became aware of the Wold Newton Family and Wold Newton Universe initially through websites articles by Jess Nevins, that led me to the Philip Jose’ Farmer Wold Newton Universe website ran by Win Scott Eckert. The Wold Newton Family concept was developed by the late great science fiction writer, Philip Jose’ Farmer back in 1972 and 1973 when he wrote Tarzan Alive: The Definitive Biography of Lord Greystoke (1972) and Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life (1973).

The premise of this concept concerns the real-life exploits of the men who would inspire the fictional Lord of Apes and the Man of Bronze.

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And here’s the thing: these men were part of an illustrious family of heroes and villains descended from a group of noteworthy historical characters who happened to be riding in two carriages in Wold Newton, East Riding, Yorkshire, England on Friday, December 13, 1795, when a bizarre event occurred that would have lasting effects for the world of literature and popular fiction.

I went in depth in my last interview, however, I would much rather have new readers find and read these books than spoil them.

Trust me, for anyone who is a fan of fictional biographies, and television series like “The X Files”, The Pretender” and Heroes, and if they are a fan of crossovers, they owe it to themselves to read these two books, and then seek out other books in the Wold Newton series.

Part of the fun is the hunt for these books and seeing how they connect to one another. You will not be disappointed.

DF: You hit the lottery and win $100 million. What’s the one movie you would make and why?

LG: Planetary.

Because it’s long overdue. And the movie will shake things up a bit. However, it will need a director like Zack Snyder, Matthew Vaughn, or Christopher Nolan to make Planetary work on the big screen or small screen.

A lot of new directors and producers will find a lot in Planetary to be problematic from their point of view. They will not have the stomach for it.

And I would have the films stream on Amazon Prime or Google Play as a series of six 90-minute films. The scope of Planetary is too big to contain in the theaters. At least, for what I would do with that particular project. And I would have Warren Ellis and John Cassaday as Executive Producers on the film series.

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I even have my own fan casting for the film if it is ever made. You can find my fan cast on my Facebook page or in the Comics on Screen Facebook group.

Unfortunately, Warner Bros. and Hollywood would need to strike the iron while it’s hot. The actors I have chosen the project are not getting any younger. And the superhero comic movie bubble is bound to burst in the near future. Many don’t want to believe it, but it’s coming. That train will not be late. So, for now, it’s best to get out as much superhero live action content as possible. Because it will be on the decline sooner than many think.

DF: What are your favorite Comic Books; past and present.

LG: Planetary by Warren Ellis and John Cassaday remains my favorite comic book series of all-time, with the recent run of The Ultimates by Al Ewing and Kenneth Rocafort, and the always on hiatus S.H.I.E.L.D. (2011) series by Jonathan Hickman and Dustin Weaver coming in as the second and third tier series I love to read. Right now, Mark Millar’s Prodigy series might be joining that exemplary group of excellent comic book series. The jury is still out. But it’s looking like it might be.

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DF: You’ve been reading Comic Books for a long time. What’s wrong with them? How can we fix them? And does the Comic Book industry as a whole have a future?

LG: To be frank, half-ass political posturing and pandering, and the need to reboot comic book universes are becoming the death nails for superhero comic book industry at the moment.

The writer’s personal political agenda should service the story, not the other way around, as it currently is. And right now, that’s a lot of comics these days. Furthermore, I don’t think that these writers actually care for the characters they are writing about.

And sadly, I don’t see this changing anytime soon. The current crop of writers and artists are riding the wave of outrage culture, and the bandwagon they are riding on has been losing traction and is about to go over a cliff. And instead of fixing the mess they started, they reboot.

That’s why I hate trends. And I hate to say it, but it needs to be allowed to go on until it’s no longer a thing. When the readers become completely immune to these trends, then matters will correct themselves. But we aren’t out the woods yet. We have a way to go before we are in the clear. But we will get there.

The future of comic book publishing resides with the independent publishers.

Disney is going to eventually shut down publishing at Marvel Comics, and Warner Bros. will follow suit with DC Comics. And it will happen in the next few years. It’s no longer profitable for Disney and WB to keep their comic book publishing divisions going. They are losing revenue yearly, and from a financial standpoint, it is better for Disney and Warner Bros. to maintain control of the licensing for their catalog of characters than to continue publishing comics that are being bought by retailers who are having a hard time selling those comics to readers at the price tags they are currently selling them at.

That’s why smart readers, like myself, wait for the trade paperbacks of the series that interest us.

DF: Why does it seem that the Comic Book industry and Hollywood has such a problem getting Classic Pulp right?

LG: It comes down to present day prejudicial mindsets about Classic Pulp.

Some of these mindsets are justified, while others border on juvenile.

There’s a rugged no-nonsense masculinity that Classic Pulp has that, for the most part, has little traction with current generation. Some get it, while others will not only not get it, but will refuse to even look at it.

Mostly, because if it hasn’t been a thing for the last forty years, then why bother looking at it? It’s a sad way of looking at pop culture enthusiasm, or lack thereof, but that’s the world we live in at the moment. And that’s why we had a Doc Savage film planned by Shane Black who had Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, the actor who would have played Doc Savage, thinking that Doc Savage is a “weirdo.” Apparently, Shane Black and Dwayne Johnson don’t understand The Man of Bronze or the world he and his colleagues inhabit.

Therefore, what they can’t relate to, they lampoon. Because lampooning is allowed and encouraged. That seems to be acceptable behavior in Hollywood for some reason. Just look at the recent Sherlock Holmes film with Will Ferrell, The Lone Ranger film with Johnny Depp, or The Green Hornet film with Seth Rogen. There’s definitely a pattern.

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DF: Do you think that New Pulp is doing a good job in terms of addressing issues of race, sexism and stereotypes that Classic Pulp gets criticized for?

LG: In my opinion, New Pulp is the avenger and saving grace of Classic Pulp, cleaning up the outdated customs, practices, and prejudices that gave birth to that genre, all the while providing more depth and gravitas to Classic Pulp. Especially when you look at anthology series like Black Pulp and Asian Pulp.

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People of color were more than racial stereotypes seen as either servants, savages, or nefarious. We were adventurers, explorers, inventors, detectives, soldiers, sailors, and spies. We were there when America and the world needed us. But very few back then were mindful or brave enough to translate real life heroism as pulp adventure fiction for the people to read. Finding a Black Pulp hero back then was like finding a needle in a field of haystacks. Good luck finding one.

These anthologies redress those issues and correctly brings them to light, and inspired the creation of Pulp heroes and adventurers who could have stood shoulder to shoulder with Tarzan, Doc Savage, The Avenger, The Shadow, The Spider, G-8, Operator #5, and Secret Agent X back in the Golden Age of the Pulps. No joke. I am very serious.

And some of the strong female characters I have read come from New Pulp. They are not to be underestimated. Do so at your own peril.

My advice to new readers is to search online for New Pulp books, read and enjoy these books, and go back and read the book series that made up Classic Pulp. And include international titles as well so that you understand the world of Classic Pulp. America wasn’t the only country producing pulps back then. France and Germany were big on pulp literature for a while before the Second World War.

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DF: Where do you see New Pulp right now? And where should it be going?

LG: New Pulp is in Phase 3 of its development. This is an important time for the genre and the movement that brought it into existence. Where it goes next is the key.

In order for New Pulp to thrive in the new age, New Pulp needs to expand into graphic novels, comic books, video games, and tabletop RPG’s. Continue to publishing amazing stories, however, the future of New Pulp will be boundless and have a lasting impact when it branches out into these markets.

And now is the best time to start this transition.

DF: I’m still waiting to see your name on a book/novel. Are you working on anything now? What are your plans (if any) for a writing career?

LG: Projects are in the incubation phase right now.

But it’s not over. Not by a longshot.

I’m working on something that combines my love of espionage pulp, spypunk, cyberpunk, Tokasatsu armored heroes and villains, and Mecha. And it will all be set twenty-five years from now.

It’s a Hail Mary opportunity. But it’s one I have to take. And it’s a story I have to write. Now I have to make the time to truly start and finish it. And that is why, other than sending Birthday greetings, and prayers for those in need, my time on social media will be limited substantially very soon.

DF: What’s a typical Day In The Life of Lucas Garrett like?

LG: Mostly working, there’s a lot of hours to go around at my worksite because someone either got fired, quit, or had to take medical leave for personal or family medical emergencies.

What free time I have is spent writing, editing, researching, and assembling Mecha plastic model kits for frame of reference, 111and Facebook. I’m about to use Facebook a lot less. It’s a time waster. As much as I love using it, that’s what it is.

Derrick Ferguson: Anything else we should know?

Lucas Garrett:  I  think that about covers it.

You can check out my WordPress website: Luc’s Speculations – https://garrettluc.wordpress.com/ for my fan fiction head canon crossover theories and analysis. And like my writing, I need to post something new in the very near future.

And you can find me on Facebook and Instagram.

Thanks again for interviewing me, Derrick. I appreciate your friendship and support.

 

Kickin’ The Willy Bobo With…BEX AARON

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Derrick Ferguson: It’s been four years since we did this so we have to reprise the basic question I always ask: Who Is Bex Aaron?

Bex Aaron: Bex Aaron is Bex Awesome – at least, that’s what I tell Siri to call me! I’m almost 37. I’m a Mac person. I can be professional when the situation warrants, but I also have the mouth of a sailor. I’m a master of accents, except for New Zealand (the vowel pronunciations are so different from ours that it’s hard to master). I’m an NBA historian and a Clippers fan. I’d make a great lifeline on Millionaire. I love cats, ice cream and cold weather. I hate Mondays, LeBron James and Texas summers.

DF: Where do you live and what do you tell the IRS you do for a living?

BA: I live in Houston, Texas – born and raised, and I’m itching to get out! I want to live in the Pacific Northwest, namely Seattle. I currently work as a senior case manager for a personal injury law firm but am more than open to other opportunities! 🙂

DF: Catch us up on what been going on with you personally and professionally between our last interview in 2015 and now.

BA: Well, since we last talked, I took a really long sabbatical from writing (I just released one book between our first interview and now), but I am getting back into the swing of things now! Trying to finish up the long-awaited final book of the series, and planning out what the future might bring.

DF: Has your philosophy of writing changed from 2015 to now?

BA: I don’t know if my philosophy has changed, necessarily, but my style has. I’ve been brushing up on my skills, trying to get better and grow as a writer. I always find that reading material from writers who are better than you is a great motivator. I have a few that I’m enthralled with, and their style and way with words is helps me to be better myself.

As for my philosophy of writing, one of my songwriting mentors said it best, Christine Dente (and this is a rough paraphrase): “My goal as a writer is to create something people can connect to, to make them think and feel…but to do that, you can’t always beckon them from the front door. Sometimes, you have to use the window or the chimney to lure them in more slowly.” I believe very strongly in creating an immersive world people can get lost in, one that they (hopefully!) want to come back to.

DF: For those who are not familiar with your work (and shame on them!) tell us about your INDEPENDENCE DAY series.

BA: Independence Day takes place in a small town called Haven Park, Wyoming (fifteen miles outside of Laramie). Haven Park is quiet, and its residents are, by all intents and purposes, wholesome, god-fearing people…until the night of July 4, 1966, when the walls came closing in and the skeletons began to creep out of their closets.

It started with a murder. Carol Mathison, a lifelong resident and the only daughter of retired police chief Stanley Rogers, was found strangled in the park on the morning of July 5, leaving the community stunned. By all accounts, Carol was vibrant, well-liked, outgoing and cheerful, making her murder all the more senseless. However, as the days drag by, more and more began to be revealed about Carol’s darker side…and the many, many people who might have wanted her dead.

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DF: While reading Book One and Book Two I couldn’t help but think that INDEPENDENCE DAY falls into a genre I like to call The Little Town With Big Secrets Genre. It starts out like “Twin Peaks” what with a surprising and horrifying murder that shocks the entire town. Then we move into “Peyton Place” territory. Are you a fan of soap operas?

BA: I definitely was growing up. I was always drawn to that human element, the drama of interpersonal relationships. I’m not keen on some of the more dramatic stunts that modern soaps are prone to pull (like back from the dead, rapidly aging babies and the like), but the classic, character-based storytelling really stuck with me when I was a kid. I haven’t watched a soap in a long, long time…I’m not even sure which ones are still on the air. It’s kind of sad the genre has dwindled down to nothing, but I hope, in some small way, my books can help keep it alive for someone.

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DF: I recall you originally conceived INDEPENDENCE DAY as a five-part story. Are there still going to be five books or do you have more to tell about Haven Park beyond those five books?

BA: Yes, BOOK FIVE: THE BIG SURPRISE will be the last. I really hate typing that. I’m not very good with endings, see. This is, in fact, the only one I’ve ever done. Everything else has been open-ended, and I only stopped when I grew tired of it. It’s quite an accomplishment for me to create something with a beginning, middle and an end…even if it tears my heart out to think about having to say goodbye.

There actually is more in the pipeline for Haven Park, though. I am plotting a sequel series, which will be set thirty years into the future. I already have a rough idea of how I want the story to go, just need to sit down and actually, y’know, write it!

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DF: Anything else you’re working on we should know about?

BA: There are a few ideas I’m kicking around – one is a sci-fi, time travel love story and the other is more of a futuristic sci-fi horror short – but none have gone beyond planning stages. I don’t tend to juggle projects well. I have to stay consistent and just work on one piece at a time, or I will never accomplish anything!

DF: What are your future plans for your writing career?

BA: Oh, I’d love to have my books fashioned into a Hulu original (guys, if you’re reading this, call me!) But more realistically, I’d love to branch out into other genres and try other things. At the end of the day, I would just like to tell stories people can enjoy.

DF: What keeps you motivated to write?

BA: Keeping motivated to write is so damned hard. I’m probably the wrong person to ask, because I’m still trying to recapture my motivation myself. I would say, probably the idea that I’ve come this far, and I really need to take it the rest of the way. I want to be able to say I did it, and prove to myself that I can.

DF: What do you do with your free time when you’re not writing?

BA: I read a lot and watch a lot of TV. I’m a very boring person, without much of a social life, so I usually just relax at home with my music and my TV.

DF: Drop some Words of Wisdom on all the aspiring young writers reading this and thirsting for your knowledge.

BA: Okay, first thing’s first – if you want to get rich off this, you might be in for a very rude awakening. It’s very important to be realistic when you go into self-publishing, because while overnight success can (and does) happen to some, it is most assuredly not a guarantee.

Also: be true to yourself and your own vision. Everyone is individual, so embrace that. Don’t try to emulate anyone else, just be yourself. Trust your gut and write your stories your way.

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DF: What’s A Typical Day In The Life of Bex Aaron like?

BA: During the week, I basically get up, go to work and come home. There isn’t much going on, not that my weekends are jam-packed with excitement! I do tend to get a lot more done over the weekends, though, as far as creativity goes. I’m too mentally exhausted after work to really focus on it, so on the weekends, I try to give it a lot of attention.

Derrick Ferguson: Anything else we should know?

Bex Aaron: I’m back, and I’m trying like hell to get this final book done for you!

 

Kickin’ The Willy Bobo With…TIMOTHY MAYER

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Derrick Ferguson: Who is Timothy Mayer?

Timothy Mayer: I’m a 61-year-old business owner, novelist, freelance writer, seeker of adventure, husband, father, former armored combat fighter, ex-chemist (or did I play one on TV?), former Zine publisher, past film society organizer, one-time saxophonist in a rock band, expert on obscure cinema, and did I miss anything?

DF: Where do you live and what do you tell the IRS that it is you do for a living?

TM: I live 35 klicks up the Schuylkill River from Philadelphia. I was sent here for my sins, but the place grew on me over the years. I list myself as a chemist for tax purposes because I formulated the resins my company sells.

DF: How would you describe your style of writing?

TM: Direct. I like to get into the plot right away. No reason for long, meandering openings. These days, the reader wants to know in the first sentence why he or she should buy the book.

DF: How long have you been writing?

TM: Professionally? For the past five years. As something I liked to do? Since I was 12.

DF: Have you found an audience yet? If so, how did you do it? If not, why haven’t you?

TM: I’m still working on that one. I think my Code Name Wolfgirl books are a step in the right direction. At least the letters I’ve received from the readers indicate it.

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DF: I would say you enjoy writing in a variety of genres. Do you agree?

TM: Definitely. I’ve written in noir mystery, science fiction, epic fantasy, post-apocalypse, and horror.

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DF: What keeps you motivated to write?

TM: The knowledge that I’ll be paid when I turn the work into the publisher

DF: What do you do with your free time when you’re not writing?

TM: I work on my yard, read, hike, hang out with some local friends, and read some more. I’m a big reader, always have been.

DF: What is the one novel or story that you would recommend to anyone who doesn’t know a thing about you or your work for them to start on?

TM: Wolf Mountain. It’s the first in a trilogy that I wrote two years ago. Charted on Amazon, too. I was hired to write a litRPG series and this one was the flag ship. I’d wanted to write that book for years. This was my excuse to do it.

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DF: Drop some Words of Wisdom on all the aspiring young writers reading this and thirsting for your knowledge.

TM: Get it done. Nobody cares about your inner torment or lack of motivation. Grind that sucker out because you can’t edit a blank screen.

DF: What’s a Typical Day In The Life of Timothy Mayer like?

TM: I get up, read the news, take care of whatever I need to do for my business, and then I hit the keys. I’ll go to a coffee shop, buy some java, plug in my ear buds and start to work. My goal is always to generate 5000 words a day when I’m working on a novel.

Derrick Ferguson: Anything else we should know?

Timothy Mayer: Find someone who’ll pay you to write. Knowing that the green will be transferred to your bank account for something you wrote is a wonderful feeling. But don’t sell yourself short. Make sure you get your name on the work. It’s alright to play Casper the Friendly Ghostwriter at the beginning for peanuts, but you need to make decent coin to survive in this world.

Want to read Timothy’s stories? I sure hope so, otherwise I’ve put in a lot of work on this interview for nothing. Go HERE to peruse Timothy’s Amazon page.