Category: Action Adventure

Will Write For Food: The Freelance Stories of Derrick Ferguson

From the mean streets and crime-ridden boroughs of the modern metropolis to the dusty western wastelands where the only thing more precious than a bullet is a drop of water to soothe a parched throat, Derrick Ferguson takes the reader on journeys as visceral and vivid as a waking dream. Herein find eight stories, written for cash on the barrel to put food on the table. Sail the Seven Seas with Sinbad the Sailor, run headlong into gunfights against overwhelming odds with lawman Bass Reeves, battle against super-villains, and get hard-boiled with two-fisted detective action. Pick your poison. And make it a double.

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“The Undercover Puzzle”
“The Knobloch Collection Assignment”
“Sinbad and The Voyage to The Land of The Frozen Sun”
“Baby Daddy”
“The Ruckerville Arraignment”
“Unto You Is Born…Rayge!”
“A Town Named Affliction”
“The Bixbee Breakout”

Kickin’ The Willy Bobo With…Christofer Nigro

Derrick Ferguson: Who is Christofer Nigro and what are you all about?

Christofer Nigro: I am a humble Italian writer born and raised on the mean streets of a big city in New York State, but not fortunate enough for that big city to be the one that shares a name with the state itself and is associated with an apple and the Empire State Building. So, I’ve had to make do. Sometimes very opinionated, sometimes not funny when I try to be (okay, maybe more than just sometimes *sigh*), and always hoping to tell a good story. On pen and paper, or the modern digital equivalent thereof, that is.

I am a lifelong fan of the fantastic fiction genres, particularly those we all know as horror, sci-fi, fantasy, pulp adventure, superheroes, tokasatsu, and yes, crime noir. I have always been fascinated by the inherent subversive and larger than life nature of these genres. Hence, they are my own favorite way to tell stories, for imagining a more exciting and interesting variation of the world we live in, for pushing the limits of scientific and theological thinking; and ultimately, what they say about our culture’s vision of that which passes for heroism, villainy, the expected future, ideas of the past, what could be, and what actually is via the dynamic interplay of archetypes – some of them unique to the industrial age, others being  post-industrial versions of age-old epitomes. As in, the ancient world had Hercules and Thor, and we in the post-industrial era have Superman and Shazam. And we also still have Hercules and Thor! How awesome is that for the best of both worlds?

As such, it has been a lifelong dream of mine to add my own two or three cents to this literary mix. Hopefully, Wild Hunt Press will end up adding a silver dollars’ worth of that metaphorical currency. Stranger things have happened.

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DF: Where do you live and what do you tell the IRS you do for a living?

CN: I live in Buffalo, New York and I tell them I am running a business that I hope takes off like a business, but must have an accountant figure out what I owe nevertheless. Owing nothing is great, but that suggests you’re making next to nothing, which is not so great. I think you get the gist. I also take into account all freelance work I do, including the writing assignments I complete for other publishing companies which I get paid for, however meager said payments happen to be.

DF: How long have you been writing? And what is your motivation for writing?

CN: I have been attempting to write since I was five years old, when I stapled together a very crude little book about dinosaurs. My love of dinosaurs is reflected in much of my writing today. During my early elementary school years I attempted to put together horribly rendered comic books drawn into loose-leaf notebooks featuring various superheroes — I recall trying to do a “split book” featuring the Hulk and the Sub-Mariner, a concept of publication that always fascinated me but which has long since gone out of vogue – and one featuring Doc Savage, a classic pulp hero I came to know and become fascinated with due to the rather awesome black and white comic magazine version published by Marvel back in the day.

My first honest-to-goddess short story was one called “Evil of the Wolf Man,” which I penned in sixth grade, featuring some werewolf character whose identity I do not recall pitted against a vampiric villain I called Dr. Morbius. A name I shamelessly stole from Marvel’s vampiric anti-hero, I should fess up to. I remember being so proud of that story that I actually gave it to my grandmother to read and assess, not caring about all the explicit cuss words it had. To her credit, she read and evaluated it without making nary a complaint about all the expletives and f-bombs in the dialogue.

I wrote continuously through my high school and college years, finally getting a few things published locally in the late ‘90s when I published two editions of my college journal The Poet for academic credit (I majored in English during my second and successful attempt at obtaining a Bachelor of Arts degree). It was no big deal in retrospect, to be honest, but it was one of those things that seemed big to an aspiring writer at the time.

My first official published work was a short story in Volume 8 of Black Coat Press’s annual Tales of the Shadowmen anthology in 2010 (featuring new tales of pulp heroes and villains from vintage French literature and cinema), and I will be forever grateful to Jean-Marc Lofficier for believing in me and giving me this first big break. Much as I am likewise grateful to Tommy Hancock of Pro Se Press, Nicholas Ahlhelm of Pulp Empire, and the crew at Sirens Call Publications for giving me similar early breaks as a published author. And finally, the crew at Severed Press for publishing my first two novels.

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I am also forever indebted to Win Scott Eckert, Chuck Loridans, and other authors from the Wold Newton circle of successors to the groundbreaking work of the late, great Philip Jose Farmer for providing me with so much inspiration and the networking that eventually made it possible for me to get published.

What is my motivation? To achieve the type of immortality that most people crave, but usually attempt to achieve simply by passing on their DNA to a new generation of people bearing their surname. In the case of authors, we hope to pass on our ideas and psychic creations to successive generations. I also simply love doing it, I enjoy doing my best to make a difference and impact on the world via the written word, and I cannot think of a better form of hard work that is suited to me as an individual.

DF: What have you learned about yourself through your writing?

CN: Well, for one thing, I learned that I have a habit of making overly long sentences with a lack of finesse for brevity, which has driven some of my editors crazy at times. Which has in turn taught me to be very appreciative of their efforts and patience, which I like to think has been carried over to my own work as an editor.

I learned how important perseverance and determination are to human achievement, not to mention the requirement of having a thick skin for when the inevitable negative reviews and criticism of your work come in. Not to mention the rejections.  I always wondered if I could handle these things and learn the discipline required to be prolific and successful in this field. Sometimes I still wonder, but so far, so good, I like to say.

I also learned that, thankfully, I am capable of pushing myself to do things I enjoy doing, even when the going gets rough. I was stoked to discover this, considering how poorly motivated I am to do things that need to be done but which I am not quite so fond of doing. Like managing time, cleaning up the potato chip crumbs I left all over my carpet following a snack, and making those dentist appointments.

Most importantly, I also learned that there is indeed a field where being opinionated, having a lot to say about a lot of things, and providing a sounding board for my ideas is useful rather than counter-productive. Well, most of the time, anyway. These days we live in a world predominated by political correctness, so not all opinions are welcome. However, writers are supposed to be subversive, and supposed to make people think when they do not want to. It can be nice to know you are providing a service that society needs, even though it’s one they often do not want. That is part of the risk this particular field entails.

People have a strong psychological requirement of feeling needed. But they also like to feel wanted, and this is a field where you quickly learn you cannot have everything.

So, one thing you quickly find out about yourself with writing is whether you prefer to play it safe and simply be entertaining, which writers can certainly do to great success; or try to say something about the world we live in and hopefully do so in an entertaining way, which can be quite dangerous. Not only to society, but to you. So, in some ways, being a writer helps you test your mettle against the world around you and see how often you can get up again after being knocked down. Not to mention learning to struggle in a field that, contrary to popular outside belief, is notoriously difficult to make a good living from. This forces us to ask whether making a lot of money is truly the sole measure of accomplishment or success in the world we know.

DF: How much room in your head do you allow do you allow for critics and criticism?

CN: I try to leave quite a bit in there for that, because writers (and all creatives, of course) have to be prepared for a lot of serious criticism – both personally from friends and editors, and publicly via critics you do not know. In fact, you need to be prepared for a serious public drubbing at times. You quickly learn that this is not work for sissies, because you must leave yourself vulnerable and open to public scrutiny.

Are there times when I want to give up after I get the latest bad review or drubbing that is visible for all to see? Of course. Until several minutes of teeth gnashing pass and you realize these types of psychological beatings and public verbal floggings are a routine occupational hazard for writers. Much like carpal tunnel syndrome is.

Of course, there are different types of criticism, with varying degrees of value. Constructive criticism that is genuine is a blessing despite the pain involved in receiving it, because it can tell you what your specific weaknesses are in storytelling, and what you should work on to improve your craft.

Ironic criticism, i.e., light-hearted roasting, is also to be expected, and I think, useful. It teaches you to be humble and not to take things too seriously all the time. This is good for your ego, as it keeps you grounded and resistant to becoming too full of yourself for each success you may achieve.

Derogatory criticism, that which is clearly designed just to be nasty and make someone feel bad about themselves, is not helpful. However, it is also an occupational hazard you have to expect and learn to deal with when you put yourself out there like creatives do. For instance, when I get a negative review that simply says, “Do not buy this book! It was awful, and if you must read it, see if you can rent it or borrow it for free. But do not spend any money on it!” … and nothing other than that, they are not helping either you or their fellow readers understand why they are feeling that way, or what you, as a writer, may need to improve on. They are just taking jabs at you with no real point behind it except to vent over feeling they wasted their time and money on your work.

I also have a pet peeve for nitpickers, because I believe all readers should not expect any work to be perfect and without a few nits to pick, especially considering how writers already have to take a lot of criticism for often genuinely serious matters. Adding a few kicks to a flurry of punches can be perceived as adding insult to a bullet wound, even if that initial shot to the gut was necessary. Kicking a guy after he is already laying there in a pool of his own blood is arguably not particularly necessary.

And of course, there are some people who find it easier to be critical than to say positive things even if they honestly feel more positive than negative feedback was warranted. And there are those critics who feel it’s simply their job to tear things apart rather than to criticize in a balanced fashion. Then there are those who dislike what you wrote because they may have picked up your book with a specific set of expectations that you never intended to meet.

So, again, criticism is a thing a writer must be prepared for, and something he/she needs to steel him/herself against no matter how much it may sting or be the written equivalent of a kick to the diaphragm. I try to take the genuine constructive criticism to heart for the useful and necessary feedback it is, and inure myself against the nitpicking, pointless “venting” critiques, and outright mean-spirited attacks while taking the constructive criticism to heart in the proper spirit for which it was generously offered. It’s going to come, and you have to be ready for it, just as a construction worker needs to wear that metal safety helmet in preparation of getting hit on the noggin from a metal bolt dropped from a hundred feet up.

One important thing I try to keep in mind, which all writers must, is that it’s utterly impossible to please everyone. One thing you are likely to notice with your reviews is that the things which some readers hated about your story/book are precisely the things that others absolutely loved about it. What is “good” or “bad” is often very subjective, and readers have a variety of aesthetic and stylistic tastes.

This is why, as an editor and publisher, I try to accept all professionally rendered submissions even if they happen to have a style or method of storytelling that I do not personally like. Because I know its very likely many readers will indeed like the work, even if I and certain other readers may not.

DF: What’s with the obsession with The Wold Newton Universe?

CN: The idea of a shared universe where many characters and concepts created by a vast array of writers, illustrators, game designers, etc., co-exist side-by-side and can actually run into each other just as surely as you and I can in the world outside our window is fascinating to many. As is the idea of a world, an entire universe, that is shaped by the activities and consequences of this multitude of exceptional beings and events while still reasonably resembling the one we know (and sometimes love) is ripe for creative inspiration and ruminations on how much more interesting the world we live in could be if only this or that physical law was a bit laxer.

Which one of these many extraordinary personages may be related without anyone – including possibly their own creators or original writers – knowing about it? Which of them may have contributed actions that beget or aided and abetted the life story of another personage, or this or that significant event, recorded in disparate sources by other writers? What type of hidden world or sequence of events would result from the sum of their various actions, independent or otherwise, over the course of that secret history going on alongside an analogue of the one we know?

It takes a lot of overthinking, yes, and it’s certainly not for every writer or consumer of genre fiction. But for those of us who find it a useful and interesting mental exercise to conceive of such a world, it can be quite fun and creatively inspiring to dwell on. And yes, maybe even obsessive. I am certainly one of the guilty parties in that regard.

For many, the Wold Newton Universe was the Holy Grail that got the New Pulp Movement started in many ways. Or, at least those of us fascinated with para-scholarship that seeks out hidden connections dispersed throughout a huge number of sources, sometimes via a variety of creative mediums outside of prose, both intentional and perceived.

There are actually a lot of intentional and semi-intentional “Easter Eggs” in the form of cross-source references, some blatant and others subtle/merely implied, thrown into works intended to make connections to others. This includes sources composed by entirely different creative teams from a variety of eras. Seeking these little gems out and making further connections for inclusion in the overall tapestry of a shared universe is the basis of a literary methodology that Win Scott Eckert christened ‘creative mythography’ (I strongly believe it was Win who coined the term, but if I am misremembering, I have no problem with being corrected).

The Wold Newton Universe is specifically Win Scott Eckert’s extension of the shared pulp universe connections conceived by the great sci-fi and pulp adventure author Philip Jose Farmer, largely within his para-biographies Tarzan Alive and Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life, as well as further short stories, articles, and other works by PJF. This was primarily embodied in the Wold Newton Family, a group of famous pulp heroes and villains of yesteryear who were genetically connected as a result of a few horse-driven carriages of their ancestors being irradiated by the mysterious energies of a meteor that landed in a field located within Wold Newton, Yorkshire, England circa 1795 (hence, the name of both that lineage and the shared universe it occurred within). The Wold Newton Universe was further added to and extrapolated upon between the late 1990s and mid-2000s by the creative inspiration of Chuck Loridans with the original MONSTAAH site, Dennis Power with his Secret History of the Wold Newton Universe site, and numerous other dabblers contributing articles to these sites (including yours truly).

After several years, it was decided by Win that the term “Wold Newton Universe” should be reserved for PJF’s specific oeuvre of work, or those directly connected to it by his successors. This is because the term “Wold Newton” was derived from PJF’s work and was not entirely about crossovers, which the expanded view of the Wold Newton Universe became associated with. Win therefore differentiated the expanded shared universe that incorporated the numerous additions extrapolated from crossover refs that were well outside of PJF’s personal body of work as, appropriately enough, the Crossover Universe. He provided a timeline for the Crossover Universe, now officially coined as such, in two big great volumes of Crossovers: A Secret Chronology of The World, followed up by two additional and similarly impressive  authorized volumes of Crossover Expanded by Sean Levin.

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The idea of a shared universe where many characters and concepts created by a vast array of writers, illustrators, game designers, etc., co-exist side-by-side and can actually run into each other just as surely as you and I can in the world outside our window is fascinating to many. As is the idea of a world, an entire universe, that is shaped by the activities and consequences of this multitude of exceptional beings and events while still reasonably resembling the one we know (and sometimes love) is ripe for creative inspiration and ruminations on how much more interesting the world we live in could be if only this or that physical law was a bit more lax.

Which one of these many extraordinary personages may be related without anyone – including possibly their own creators or original writers – knowing about it? Which of them may have contributed actions that beget or aided and abetted the life story of another personage, or this or that significant event, recorded in disparate sources by other writers? What type of hidden world or sequence of events would result from the sum of their various actions, independent or otherwise, over the course of that secret history going on alongside an analogue of the one we know?

It takes a lot of overthinking, yes, and it’s certainly not for every writer or consumer of genre fiction. But for those of us who find it a useful and interesting mental exercise to conceive of such a world, it can be quite fun and creatively inspiring to dwell on. And yes, maybe even obsessive. I am certainly one of the guilty parties in that regard.

For many, the Wold Newton Universe was the Holy Grail that got the New Pulp Movement started in many ways. Or, at least those of us fascinated with para-scholarship that seeks out hidden connections dispersed throughout a huge number of sources, sometimes via a variety of creative mediums outside of prose, both intentional and perceived.

There are actually a lot of intentional and semi-intentional “Easter eggs” in the form of cross-source references, some blatant and others subtle/merely implied, thrown into works intended to make connections to others. This includes sources composed by entirely different creative teams from a variety of eras. Seeking these little gems out and making further connections for inclusion in the overall tapestry of a shared universe is the basis of a literary methodology that Win Scott Eckert christened creative mythography (I strongly believe it was Win who coined the term, but if I am misremembering, I have no problem with being corrected).

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The Wold Newton Universe is specifically Win Scott Eckert’s extension of the shared pulp universe connections conceived by the great sci-fi and pulp adventure author Philip Jose Farmer, largely within his para-biographies Tarzan Alive and Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life, as well as further short stories, articles, and other works by PJF. This was primarily embodied in the Wold Newton Family, a group of famous pulp heroes and villains of yesteryear who were genetically connected as a result of a few horse-driven carriages of their ancestors being irradiated by the mysterious energies of a meteor that landed in a field located within Wold Newton, Yorkshire, England circa 1795 (hence, the name of both that lineage and the shared universe it occurred within). The Wold Newton Universe was further added to and extrapolated upon between the late 1990s and mid-2000s by the creative inspiration of Chuck Loridans with the original MONSTAAH site, Dennis Power with his Secret History of the Wold Newton Universe site, and numerous other dabblers contributing articles to these sites (including yours truly).

After several years, it was decided by Win that the term “Wold Newton Universe” should be reserved for PJF’s specific oeuvre of work, or those directly connected to it by his successors. This is because the term “Wold Newton” was derived from PJF’s work and was not entirely about crossovers, which the expanded view of the Wold Newton Universe became associated with. Win therefore differentiated the expanded shared universe that incorporated the numerous additions extrapolated from crossover refs that were well outside of PJF’s personal body of work as, appropriately enough, the Crossover Universe. He provided a timeline for the Crossover Universe, now officially coined as such, in two big great volumes of Crossovers: A Secret Chronology of the World, followed up by two additional and similarly impressive authorized volumes of Crossovers Expanded by Sean Levin.

This is where the differentiation stands today, though of course many fans and creative mythographers are still in the habit of referring to the Crossover Universe as the “Wold Newton Universe” out of sheer habit, something I was guilty of a long time myself. But the current distinction is important to note.

And from there lies the genesis of the Wild Hunt Universe, as I call it. Back in the day, such an expansive concept as the Wold Newton Universe (before it became dis-entangled from what would eventually be called the Crossover Universe) obviously led to a host of disagreements and creative differences among numerous creative mythographers and pulp fiction fans as to what should or should not be included within its shared framework, and what might or might not appropriately fit into what was essentially a universe of pulp heroes/villains and monsters/horror heroes. The divide was crossed at many different lines, so many of us developed what back then we would call a “personal Wold Newton Universe,” whereas the one authorized by Win and his main fellow curators was often referred to as the “consensus Wold Newton Universe.”

Obviously, the expected creative differences, be they subtle or extensive, between such a large pool of authors and researchers resulted in a multitude of alternate variations of the Wold Newton Universe/Crossover Universe. Think of what Krona in the DC Universe did to create the Pre-Crisis Multiverse (before it was temporarily wiped out a few times and brought back again via Crisis after Crisis), only a lot less cosmic, and with we creative mythographers to blame for it rather than a rogue alien scientist.

Out of that cosmic catastrophe of creative conflicts came the Wild Hunt Universe. Among others. So, now we have another new multiverse. It’s getting crowded out there. Hence, while the Wild Hunt Universe is not the same as the Crossover Universe, it is a similar variation of it in that it is first and foremost a pulp hero and monster universe but may include or dispense of some elements known to exist in the Crossover Universe proper.

DF: Tell us about Wild Hunt Press.

CN: It is, plain and simple, my dream. I hope to one day make a living off my writing as do so many of us in this racket, and to help many other authors and artists do the same with an indie niche of my own in the field. One that is inundated with my way of doing things and building from there with the contributions of others.

Like many indie imprints, I hope to experiment and publish works that the big labels would deem “too risky” or “not commercial enough” and see what may actually click with the readers. As well as some publications that are not subject to the too-common PC rules of many other indie publishers. There is too much of that right now, as I see it. Sometimes you have to risk offending people to get them thinking, to expand boundaries, and to provide something new or a serious exchange of ideas; otherwise, no matter the quality of the work you publish, you end up fading into the crowd. Not that taking risks is necessarily the road to success, as that can break you as well as make you if all doesn’t go well, but part of the risk in doing something new is, well, taking these risks in the first place.

I will be focusing heavily on the genres I most like to read/view and write myself: horror, sci-fi, fantasy, tokasatsu, crime noir, and pulp adventure fiction. But I am hoping to expand into more experimental territory and play with other genres outside of the above from time to time and see what comes of it.

I will publish my own novels and single-author anthologies, those of others, and multi-author anthologies. Some of these works will be my own take on concepts others have published, and in other cases going in directions that no one has ever gone before. Hopefully.

DF: Tell us about The Warp Event Universe.

CN: This is distinct from the Wild Hunt Universe, which is essentially a pulp /monster/sci-fi universe, a similar variation on the Crossover Universe as noted above. In contrast, the Warp Event Universe will be an actual shared superhero universe. This will be an Earth whose history was very much like the world outside our window, save for a series of periodically occurring mysterious flashes of cosmic energy in the near-vicinity of the planet. They hit very localized areas across the globe, and when they do, the physical laws of that part of the universe changes so that what was previously improbable now becomes nightmarishly likely.

Many people caught in the energy surges of the Warp Events begin developing metahuman powers, on a world where they previously existed only in comic books or on film etc. Some of them change in cool and spectacular ways, others that are actually disturbing and even horrific. Certain animals caught in the Warp Events mutate into strange creatures; certain locales have a dimensional breach punched in time/space that permit access to other dimensions, with strange beings entering this reality from another… some of them may become heroes themselves, and others something decidedly different. And to top it off, exotic forms of technology that wouldn’t work previously suddenly become functional and viable – everything from suits of power-conferring armor, to plasma rifles, to sentient robots.

In short, a once more or less mundane Earth like our own suddenly becomes an amazing, much more interesting, and often outright terrifying place. The corporations and governments of the world respond accordingly, particularly the armed forces and various mercenary guilds, each hoping to study and exploit all of the above phenomena to their advantage. The various publications taking place in this shared universe will show the trials and tribulations of various individuals who are struggling to become heroes after ascending into metahumanity, or deciding to use their powers for very different purposes; or beings from beyond who suddenly gain access to this brave new world from another world; or simply striving to oppose or gain some measure of control over these forces.

The first two published novels in the Warp Event Universe, both written by me, are Centurion: Dark Genesis and Moonstalker: A Knight in Buffalo. Also taking place in the Warp Event Universe is my short story “An Un-Bear-Able Day in Cuyahoga” featuring my teen hero duo Moth Girl & Locust Lad, published in the multi-author superhero anthology The Good Fight 4: Homefront by Local Hero Press. They will soon get their own novel published by Wild Hunt Press.

Granted, the first batch of these heroes are teens, but all similarity between them ends beyond that. And future heroes and villains I have planned for the Warp Event Universe will not be limited to teens. One of them will be Ultimus, an adult who becomes the premiere superhero of  that world and respected by most for his genuine and inspiring nobility… but only because the public is unaware of his rather bizarre secret. Another will be Mr. Mystik, an otherworldly master of magick who enters the Warp Event Universe through a dimensional portal and attempts to protect the people of Earth from the various phenomena that has also bridged the gap between worlds… except that his system of ethics conflicts with that of the human race in some rather unsettling ways. And yes, a team featuring many of these heroes is also planned along the way.

For the record, Centurion is an emotionally troubled young teen who is suddenly beset with extraordinary powers due to being suffused in the energies of a local Warp Event. It’s his intention to become the type of hero he had always admired in the comic books, but the serious emotional scars he carries as a result of being a severely bullied social outcast causes him to lash out in ways that make him as great a menace as the Warp Event-spawned threats he tries to oppose.

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Moonstalker is another teen hero who inhabits the same city as Centurion but is without superhuman powers. Rather, he has extremely formidable martial arts training and other skills & various weaponry related to that, and he takes up the mantle of a ninja-like vigilante to launch a brutal one-man war against a dangerous street gang that seeks to rule Buffalo’s East Side. The only thing is, Moonstalker’s ego is every bit as large as his set of martial arts skills and he believes he can control the East Side in a more benevolent fashion than the gangs. And then there is the matter of the several copycat vigilantes who begin springing up in the wake of his reputation, along with the fact that the police want to take down Moonstalker as much as the street gang itself.

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DF: How difficult was it creating your own superhero universe?

CN: It was something I definitely had to do some planning on. Centurion and Moonstalker are actually updated versions of characters I created way back during my high school years, and I had written some short stories and dossiers featuring these early versions of the characters. I even published one story for each of them locally — one in my aforementioned college journal The Poet (where Moonstalker appeared under his original name of Nightstalker, before I became convinced that moniker was much too ‘taken”); and the Centurion story in the first issue of a long gone, locally published zine that was called The Rebel’s Advocate. The new versions are updated so their stories take place in the 2010s. So now, each will be able to make use of an incredible technological breakthrough known as cell phones, devices unavailable to their earlier versions.

As you may surmise, I have long wanted to put these characters into official publication, and it’s far past the time that it finally happened. There are many superhero universes in prose right now, with the various authors going in some wild directions, whereas others take a more traditional route. Will the Warp Universe stand out amongst this mighty crowd? I do not by any means consider myself a superior writer to the many awesome authors of superhero prose fiction contributing to the market right now (many of whom are terrific inspirations to me). However, I am hoping that the characters and universe under my pen and editorial hand provide something unique and special to that market, much as all the other superhero characters and universes guided by other authors and editors are providing their own unique offerings. Is there room for all of us? Well, it’s a mighty big multiverse out there, so I like to think so.

What I had to really think about is whether or not this shared universe would be united by a specific source that connected virtually every instance of metahuman powers and strange phenomena, as was the case with Marvel’s old New Universe experiment (remember that? I sure do!); or, would multiple fantastic phenomena that are oftentimes unconnected to each other form the backdrop, as with the Marvel Universe proper. I ultimately decided on the former, with the obvious hope that this universe thrives better than the one whose basic premise partially inspired it. However, the heroes of the Warp Event Universe will often be much more powerful than the likes of D.P.7 and Psi-Force from the New Universe, and a wider range of phenomena will erupt from the Warp Events, including other dimensional sentient beings, actual supernatural monsters, and truly advanced technology (including fully sentient machines).

I also had to ask myself this: Do I want characters who are essentially people first, and heroes second (as was most often the case in Marvel’s Ultimate Universe), thus providing good-intentioned albeit highly flawed individuals we can all relate to? Or, have a universe full of essentially noble and selfless heroes of the traditional sort that inspire us? I decided to go for both of the above, and everything in between and outside any definition of “hero” altogether. Secondly, do I go for a grim and gritty tone, or something more fun and light-hearted? I again opted for variance in accordance with varied taste among the readers, with Centurion and Moonstalker being grim and rather dark characters, but Moth Girl & Locust Lad being heroes whose exploits and overall tone puts the word “fun” back in the superhero genre.

DF: Tell us about DORIAN GRAY: DARKER SHADES

CN: This is a multi-author anthology designed to deal with what was, prior to Halloween 2018, a glaring omission in the world of gothic horror: the utter lack of original prose tales featuring Dorian Gray, one of the most intriguing and versatile characters (from a storytelling point of view) in the history of fantastic fiction. And certainly, Oscar Wilde’s greatest creation.

Dorian Gray has been featured in movies, TV shows, video games, comic books, an excellent audio series from Big Finish – but no original prose, save for a duplicate of the novel that features additional erotica so that some of his hornier fans no longer had to rely on their imagination to fill in the gaps (pun not intended, honest!). Other than that, we had a good number of novels and anthologies that featured alternate reality versions of Gray or stories inspired by the concept behind the character, but no original prose that continues the actual saga begun in “The Picture of Dorian Gray.”

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This anthology rectifies that rather inexplicable oversight. It features contributions from some of the best authors in horror fiction today, including none other than Peter Rawlik, Micah Harris, and the legendary comic book writer T. Casey Brennan (his first officially published prose to my knowledge). And more, including a novella from yours truly, a new short story by Kevin Heim, and a short one act play (just call it a playlet) by playwright David MacDowell Blue. The volume tops off with an extensive Dorian Gray timeline chronicling his history in the Wild Hunt Universe, culled from numerous sources across all mediums, and it’s co-authored by Robert E. Wronski Jr. (who provided the framework) and moi (who provided a bunch of extrapolations to Rob’s work).

Oh, and for crossover fanatics, the various tales feature Dorian Gray meeting up with the likes of Dracula, Dr. Pretorius, Becky Sharp (of Vanity Fair), Carmilla (of Sheridan Le Fanu’s classic eponymous vampire novella), Richard Pickman of the classic Lovecraftian tale “Pickman’s Model,” and… well, you’ll see!

DF: Tell us about THE EXPERIMENT

CN: This is a linear, multi-author anthology of separate but interconnected stories that is the brainchild of author Zach Cole. It occurs in a reality distinct from the Wild Hunt or Warp Event Universes, as well as Zach’s Blue Moon Universe where the novels featuring his monster hunting werewolf Jeremy Walker and the heroic daikaiju Marugrah take place. But it’s definitely a horror universe, and when Zach gets around to giving it a name, I’ll let you know!

The initial framing story, penned by Zach, features a black ops bio-weapons program called Project Hydra that is sequestered in the notorious Area 51 military facility at Groom Lake, Nevada. Basically, this top-secret program had the goal of creating six distinct and ultra-deadly new lifeforms created by splicing various genetic combinations of some of Earth’s most dangerous predatory animals with strands of alien DNA recovered from a crashed spacecraft. The resulting Subjects were supposed to be under the control of the U.S. Armed Forces for use as biological weapons on the battlefield. Of course, as is often the case with such things, plans go horribly awry, all six of the Subjects break free from the base after first going on a bloody rampage inside of the facility itself, and promptly go their separate ways to find refuge throughout the hidden byways of Nevada (and even beyond the state’s borders, as you will see).

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What follows are short stories and novellas scribed by different authors, including Zach and yours truly, which chronicle the bloody havoc wreaked on the lives of different groups of unwary civilians who come into contact with each one of the monstrous Subjects of Project Hydra; along with the efforts of special task force units of armored soldiers sent from Area 51 to track down and neutralize the incredibly dangerous creatures. And it ends with a final framing tale co-authored by Zach and yours truly that shows the aftermath of these events, along with revealing the plans that the Area 51 bureaucracy have in dealing with the residual problems left over from Project Hydra.

This anthology features the debut of several new authors, and I am proud to provide them with an outlet for some of their first published work.

DF: So where does Wild Hunt Press go from here?

CN: I can only hope it will go where successful small indie publishing efforts go. Towards that end, I will continue to strive to do what indie publishers do best: bring experimental genre titles to readers, to help many new professionally qualified authors and artists get the big break they need and deserve, and to put my own stamp on it in the process. One of those tasks that sounds simple when described, but is actually not quite so simple in practice, of course. But here’s to the effort!

DF: What’s an average Day In The Life of Christofer Nigro like?

CN: Dealing with whatever life may throw at you, much like everyone else. More specifically for a typical day, a lot of reading (and trying to become faster at it!), listening to music, drinking coffee, Green tea, or soda (whichever I most have a fancy for that day), and doing my share of writing, editing, formatting, discussing project ideas with contributing authors and artists, and hopefully treating myself to a pizza on that particular day.

Derrick Ferguson: Anything else we need to know?

Christofer Nigro: One other major thing! Wild Hunt Press is honored to have a collusion with author/artist Zach Cole, the scribe of the A Jeremy Walker Thriller series, the mastermind behind Wild Hunt’s just published linear horror anthology The Experiment, and with more from him to come under the Wild Hunt imprint, including Legion: A Thriller, Lovecraft: A Kaiju Thriller, and new editions of his first kaiju and Jeremy Walker novels that comprise his Blue Moon Universe. As for the immediate present, The Titans’ Children, Zach’s newest novel in the saga of Jeremy Walker, monster hunting werewolf, and Marugrah, his heroic kaiju, is now on sale from Wild Hunt Press.

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Derrick Ferguson Takes Aim At THE AVENGERS: TOO MANY TARGETS

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By John Peel and Dave Rogers

Mass Market Paperback: 224 pages

Publisher: Tor Books; 1st edition (June 15, 1998)

ISBN-10: 0812589092

ISBN-13: 978-0812589092

Mention The Avengers to your average Joe or Jane Punchclock and they’ll most likely assume that you must be talking about the blockbuster movies featuring a team of Marvel superheroes. And they’re right. But there’s another team of Avengers that has just as loyal following as those other Avengers ever since the 1960’s. The British TV series THE AVENGERS starred Patrick Macnee as John Steed. Originally, he wasn’t the main character. That was Dr. David Keel played by Ian Hendry. THE AVENGERS started out as pretty much a straight up crime drama but that changed once Steed became the main character and was partnered up with a succession of beautiful assistants. Women whose names soon became legendary due to their intelligence, sophistication, style, talents and abilities that made them easily as equal as their male partner out in the field. Cathy Gale (Honor Blackman) Emma Peel (Diana Rigg) and Tara King (Linda Thorson) worked with Steed for a shadowy branch of the British Secret Service (given the name of “The Ministry” in the disastrous 1998 movie) combating enemies that became more bizarre the longer the series ran.

Robotics, time travel, mind control, invisibility, super computers wanting to take over the world, The Hellfire Club (a concept borrowed for Marvel Comics “X-Men” series) mad scientists…THE AVENGERS had all that and more, incorporating elements of science fiction, satire, parody, droll British wit flavored with eccentricity into an entertaining one hour package that ran from 1961 to 1969. There also was “The New Avengers” which ran from 1976 to 1977 that saw John Steed with two new partners played by Joanna Lumley and Gareth Hunt.

We won’t talk about the movie, okay with you?

But what I would like to talk about is THE AVENGERS: TOO MANY TARGETS. Judging from the date I’m assuming it was published to compliment the feature film. One has to wonder why there wasn’t a proper movie tie-in novelization but in this case I’m glad there wasn’t. THE AVENGERS: TOO MANY TARGETS is just fine the way it is.  It’s not a masterpiece and it’s not a book that I insist that you actually have to read but if you’re a long-time fan of the series then you’ll have a good time with this.

Somebody is going around killing agents of The Ministry. Somebody that looks a whole lot like John Steed. And he’s not a fake. Thanks to computerized voice analysis there can be no doubt. It actually is Steed. And considering his knowledge and experience, a rogue Steed is the greatest threat imaginable to British Intelligence. A reluctant Tara King is giving the assignment to eliminate him.

But while this is going on, Steed is contacted by a retired colleague who gives Steed a special assignment that comes right from The Prime Minister himself: Steed’s superior, codenamed ‘Mother’ has apparently gone rogue and is killing his own agents. Steed is given the assignment to eliminate him.

Now believe it or not, this all ties in with a wild gorilla roaming the English countryside being hunted by Cathy Gale and Dr. David Keel’s investigation into a lethal plague rampaging through the African nation of Katawa. All of these diverse threads lead everybody to Knight Industries, owned and run by Mrs. Emma Peel as apparently Knight Industries is the new birthplace of the deadliest foes The Avengers ever faced: The Cybernauts. Before, Steed and Mrs. Peel barely survived their encounters with the murderous robots. Now they have to face a new generation of Cybernauts that are faster, smarter and more powerful than their predecessors. Even with Dr. Keel, Cathy Gale and Tara King on their side, can they once again defeat the insane genius who has given The Cybernauts new life and save the world?

I trust you see the main attraction this book had for me. For the first time, Steed is working with all his former partners on the same case. There are a couple of others that don’t appear here such as the nightclub singer Venus Smith and Dr. Martin King but they only appeared in a handful of episodes each and they’re nowhere nearly as well known. A lot of the enjoyment I got out of the story was seeing how Steed’s partners interacted and worked together. Tara King isn’t very happy about Mrs. Peel so obviously enjoying the adventure and working with Steed again. Dr. Keel and Cathy Gale discover that they’re quite the formidable team of brains and brawn. And it’s downright comforting and touching to see that Steed seems to be taking an almost fatherly pride in the way his former partners mesh their talents and skills together.

And I also liked how the book is set in period. There’s a part where Mrs. Peel and Tara are talking and Mrs. Peel makes a reference that it’s been a year since she and Steed’s partnership ended. So apparently Steed and Tara managed to get that spaceship they accidentally flew off in at the end of the final episode back to Earth. Being set in period gives the writers a chance to have fun with the technology, terminology and British eccentricity of the 1960’s. It’s also pretty funny at times, especially the scene where a poor Russian agent is harassed by one Avenger after another, all looking for information on Steed’s whereabouts. It’s also appropriately bizarre in the scenes where Cathy Gale battles a gorilla and where Steed and Mrs. Peel have to fight off Cybernauts disguised as flying stone angels in a graveyard.

So, should you read THE AVENGERS: TOO MANY TARGETS? Like I said, if you liked the TV series and you’re a fan then I don’t see why you wouldn’t want to. It’s a light, breezy read and the characterizations of Steed, Mrs. Peel and Tara are as I remember them. And even though I’m not familiar with Cathy or Dr. Keel, the writers sold me on them being worthy partners of Steed and just as deserving to be called Avengers. Well-written action scenes and you can’t beat a cyborg Neo-Nazi mad scientist with an army of killer robots as bad guys. It’s a fun read.

 

 

 

 

Kickin’ The Willy Bobo With…PERCIVAL CONSTANTINE

Derrick Ferguson: It’s been something like 42 months since we last talked like this so we’ve got to do the obligatory thing where you tell the folks reading this something about you and what you’re all about. So, who is Percival Constantine and what are you all about?

Percival Constantine: I’m a professional author and university lecturer originally from Chicago, but I’ve been living in southern Japan for almost ten years. Basically, I’m a huge geek. Growing up, I was a massive fan of superhero comics, video games, and movies, and those interests haven’t abated now that I’m in my mid-thirties. I started writing comic book fanfiction when I was in high school and I published my first novel, Fallen, in 2007. Since then, I’ve been continuously writing and have produced over twenty novels, plus several short stories collected in various anthologies. My writing has been spread across many different genres, such as science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, and action/adventure.

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DF: You’ve been writing professionally for quite a few years now. Have you found your audience? Or have they found you?

PC: A little bit of both. When I first began publishing, I didn’t know what I was doing and I had no idea how to find an audience, so I’d just throw stuff out there and hope it stuck. Nothing ever really did. Over time, I learned about the importance of self-promotion and began doing things like paid advertising through avenues such as Facebook, Amazon, and different book recommendation email lists. That helped me find an audience for my work. In the process, as I was able to advertise my work to more people, it led to my books ending up in search results for related books, so it helped other readers find me.

DF: What’s the secret to good writing? Have you cracked the uncrackable code?

PC: I don’t think anyone will ever crack that code because the definition of good writing depends so much on the reader. I think as writers, the only thing we can really do is write books that we’re interested in writing. Readers are savvy and they can smell a phony a mile away. If you’re writing a book that you’re not interested in, readers will pick up on that and it will turn them off.

DF: What keeps you motivated to keep writing?

PC: My entire life has been devoted to storytelling. I devoured it as a fan, I studied it as a student, and I write and teach it as a professional. To me it’s as natural as breathing. I’ve had moments when I was frustrated and swore, double-swore, and triple-swore that I would give up writing. But I always ended up coming back. I’ve got stories I want to tell and that’s what motivates me to keep going even when readers aren’t buying.

DF: How much room in your head do you allow for critics and criticism?

PC: As much as is needed. My approach to criticism is to consider the source. Sometimes you’ll get criticism from people who simply aren’t part of your audience—and that’s fine, not everyone will be part of your audience. That kind of criticism I’ll consider, but I won’t stress myself out over it. Other times, you might get criticism for not doing something you never set out to do in the first place. I’m not going to worry about that kind of critique at all.

The most important criticism that I’ll consider is criticism that comes from people who are my intended audience. Those are the comments I’ll think about and it will make me take another look at my work. But sometimes, even after considering those critiques, I might still choose to go my own way.

I think the writer who ignores all criticism is too egotistical and the writer who takes all criticism personally is too sensitive. It comes down to something Stephen King said in On Writing: “You can’t please all of the people all of the time. You can’t even please all of the people some of the time. You just have to settle for pleasing some of the people some of the time.”

DF: What are your thoughts on where New Pulp is at today?

PC: To be honest, I don’t give a whole lot of thought to New Pulp these days. It’s something that kicked off with a lot of fanfare, but I think too many people who identify with New Pulp are more hobbyists than serious about creating a professional movement. And if they just want to be hobbyists, that’s fine. But I see far too many frustrated at a lack of momentum, yet those same people aren’t doing much to help change the landscape.

DF: Is New Pulp going anywhere? If so, where is it going? If not, why isn’t it?

PC: I don’t think so. I think it will remain a niche field for hobbyists and I doubt you’ll see a whole lot of momentum, and this ties into my previous answer. There’s a wealth of information out there for how people can take advantage of the new indie market. We have more tools than ever before—access to affordable advertising, access to wonderful cover designers, access to the kind of market research that publishers would have killed for twenty years ago.

And yet, the people in New Pulp aren’t taking advantage of these things. If you look at the successes in indie publishing, a few commonalities start to emerge: they produce books quickly, they get genre-appropriate covers, they pay attention to the genres that are hungry for books, they target the right categories on Amazon, they take advantage of advertising and mailing lists, etc. How many people in New Pulp are doing these things? I know I do it and I’ve seen my success grow as a result. But too many people are tied to the romantic notion of being an artist who doesn’t worry about the business side.

Problem is unless you’ve got someone to handle that business side for you, you aren’t going to make any money.

It’s a bit tragic, I think, because I see so many immensely talented New Pulp writers who should be killing it. I’ve read these books and they’re very good. But they aren’t getting the right covers, they aren’t targeting the right categories, they aren’t advertising or reaching out to readers with mailing lists, their production schedules are inconsistent and have far too much of a gap between releases, etc.

And yet the readership is hungry for New Pulp, they just don’t know it’s called New Pulp. Space opera came from pulp. Urban fantasy came from pulp. Superheroes came from pulp. Romance came from pulp. Horror came from pulp. Westerns came from pulp.

These genres are big right now and there are authors who are producing books in those genres and making a lot of money selling those books. But none of them are part of the New Pulp crowd.

And the difference between us and them? It’s not the quality of the writing. It’s not luck. It’s because those other authors are treating it like a business. A New Pulp writer thinks, “I want my western to have an illustrated cover just like the westerns during the pulp era had and I want readers to find me.” A successful genre author thinks, “What westerns are selling well? What do those books have in common? What do those covers have in common? How can I get my book in front of those readers? How can I get those readers onto my mailing list?”

If New Pulp writers want to be more than hobbyists, then they have to start asking these questions of themselves.

DF: Who is Luther Cross?

PC: Luther Cross is a character that came to me a long time ago. I was in the midst of writing the second novel in the Infernum series, Outlaw Blues, when tragedy struck. My computer crashed. For some reason I can’t remember, I had to wait several months before I’d be able to use software computer on the failing hard drive. So instead, I got the hard drive replaced and rather than keep writing from memory, I thought about doing something else. I’d just started binge-watching Supernatural at the point and it made me want to write something in the same vein. I was also a big fan of John Constantine from the Hellblazer comics as well as Warren Ellis’ Hellstorm: Prince of Lies comic book from the early 90s, so all those went into my conception, as well as a bunch of other stuff.

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Luther Cross is a cambion—half-human, half-demon. He was raised and trained by a secret society called the Sons of Solomon in the hopes that he would use his abilities against the forces of darkness. As an adult, he works as a paranormal investigator in Chicago. Also, somewhat uniquely in the world of urban fantasy, he’s a black man whereas most protagonists are white. That wasn’t really a conscious decision on my part, when I first visualized the character, for some reason I just pictured Idris Elba with glowing red eyes (though I’ve come to believe that if a live-action version were ever made, DB Woodside would make the perfect Luther).

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I never finished that first novel, but the character stuck with me. Years later, Tommy Hancock of Pro Se Press came to me about Pro Se’s Single Shot Signatures line and asked me if I wanted to contribute. I pitched him a few ideas, including Luther, and he liked that one the best. Jeff Hayes designed a wonderful cover and I started writing 10,000-word short stories starring Luther. Some setbacks pushed back the publication schedule and eventually, Tommy had to make the decision to scale the line back. I’d already been planning to do some novels with Luther, which Tommy was fine with and we had talked about doing some cross-promotion. But when the scale-back came, Luther’s series was one of the victims. That actually did work out for me though, because I was able to then focus solely on the novels. And so far, those books have been doing very well for me.

DF: Have you always been a fan of urban fantasy?

PC: Yes, but I didn’t always know it was called urban fantasy. Growing up, I became a big fan of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and then the spinoff Angel, plus short-lived series like The Crow: Stairway to Heaven and Brimstone. I became a fan of horror movies in college and that led me to comics like Hellblazer and Hellstorm, plus later on I watched TV shows like Supernatural and Constantine. So I’d always liked the genre, but it wasn’t until I became active in publishing that I learned it was called urban fantasy.

DF: One of the things I enjoyed most on reading your Luther Cross books is the cosmology involved that Luther operates in. I’m especially tickled by the notion that the hierarchies of Heaven and Hell are no more than celestial bureaucracies. Did you draw upon established religious doctrines for your conceptions of Heaven and Hell?

PC: I’ve looked at various sources when describing them, but I haven’t relied too heavily on any one source. When angels were introduced in Supernatural, one of the things that I really liked was that the angels were portrayed as haughty, self-righteous assholes. And it made sense. It also got me thinking a lot about the nature of both. The whole notion of 100% good or 100% evil is something that I don’t really agree with and seems very simplistic.

So that got me thinking: what is the difference between Heaven and Hell? What is the difference between angels and demons? They had to be two sides of the same coin, but it couldn’t just be good vs. evil. I needed more there.

Then it hit me: angels were made to obey. They follow orders. Lucifer was banished because he refused to follow orders, because he was prideful. So that meant Heaven was a place where rules matter more than anything else and it became a simple calculation—not good vs. evil, but order vs. chaos. And that’s when everything clicked.

DF: What are your plans for Luther Cross as a character and as a franchise?

PC: I’m currently writing the fifth book. I won’t reveal the title here because it might spoil the ending of the fourth book, Devil’s Conflict (which came out this past August). But I have at least six books in the series planned and I also have ideas for a potential spin-off series. As long as fans are still reading and I can still come up with ideas, Luther will continue on.

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That’s what I have control over. Absolutely I would love to see Luther translated into other mediums. Nothing would please me more than to see a Luther Cross series on TV or a Luther Cross movie. I’d totally be willing to write a Luther Cross comic book. I’d love a Luther Cross video game. But those things are beyond my control at the moment.

DF: Tell us about Vanguard.

PC: Vanguard was my first attempt at publishing my own original superhero series. The concept is that the world experienced a strange phenomenon in which a small percentage of humanity was granted superhuman abilities, called specials. In the face of these new challenges, the US government in secret gathered together a team of these specials in order to deal with superhuman threats. It was influenced by my love of superhero comics, especially the X-Men and the Avengers.

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My original idea was to reproduce a structure similar to many of the comics I loved growing up, where I’d write it as a serial with each installment featuring a self-contained story, but with subplots stretching out across the length of the series.

The serial approach didn’t work so well and I abandoned it about halfway through and just released season compilations. The series lasted for a total of five books (or seasons), which was my initial plan going in. I do have ideas for further books and the books that are currently out there go through periods when they experience a bump in sales. At some point, if both time and sales are preferable, I would like to return to that world.

DF: Are we going to see more adventures of Elisa Hill, The Myth Hunter?

PC: The final book ended with Elisa’s death, but there’s always the possibility for resurrection, and I’ve thought about doing more books in that world. At the moment though, there aren’t any plans. Unfortunately, the sales on The Myth Hunter books were never very strong, so it’s hard to justify it at this time when I’ve got other books that are selling far better. But I still love that character and that world and would love to return to it at some point.

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DF: Are we going to see the Infernum series return?

PC: No, no plans whatsoever. That series definitely performed the poorest of all the ones I’ve written so far. I didn’t leave open a lot of doors for future installments, either, so even if interest were there, I’m not even sure where I would go with it.

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DF: What’s a Typical Day In The Life of Percival Constantine like?

PC: I wake up around 6-7 am, shower and have my morning coffee, then I check email and do some writing. I try to shoot for 2,000 words every day, but some days are better than others and some days I just don’t do it at all. I teach at a few different locations, so my schedule every day is a little bit different, some days I’m working until evening, other days I have the afternoon off. When I get home, that’s just my decompression time. I have dinner and then either play video games, read comics or books, or watch a movie or some TV. Nothing very exciting.

Derrick Ferguson: Anything else we should know?

Percival Constantine: My website is http://percivalconstantine.com. For anyone who’s interested in discovering the world of Luther Cross, those short stories originally published by Pro Se, plus an exclusive novella, are available for free by visiting http://cross.percivalconstantine.com. There’s also a Facebook group, called Luther Cross Fans (https://www.facebook.com/groups/luthercross/) where fans can gather together and talk with me and each other about the books.

Kickin’ The Willy Bobo With…RAYMOND EMBRACK

Derrick Ferguson: Since it’s been three years and eight months since I last interviewed you we have to refresh people’s memories. Who is Raymond Embrack? Where do you live and what do you do to keep the bill collectors away?

Raymond Embrack: A member of Usimi Dero. Los Angeles. Haven’t kept them away yet. Have taken up day trading as my new art form.

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DF: Any major changes in your life since we last talked?

RE: Retired from close to doing 20 in L.A. County. Soon to move back to Washington DC.

DF: Last time I interviewed you I asked you if there was an audience for Raymond Embrack. Have they found you or have you found them?

RE: The weirdness has been out there long enough an audience is actually finding me, almost a following today. Mostly younger, a mix of exiles and hipsters. Who thought I would wind up the Jeff Goldblum of nobodies?

DF: How do you feel you’ve grown and developed as a writer in the past three years?

RE: Since Kindle Create I do all parts of production, plus design my covers.

DF: How has your attitude about your work in particular and writing in general changed or modified?

RE: I ended the intent to make book sales. I cut half my book catalog, now only write my desert island catalog of only Surf product. Turns out I only like writing Surf.

DF: Update us on Peter Surf. First off, for the folks who don’t know who Peter Surf is, tell us about him.

RE: Peter Surf is my private eye series private eye since 1996. His name comes from the music in Pulp Fiction. First published 2000. Operates in west coast Blonde City, the city Trump would build with Madonna. Surf is in part composed of Derek Flint, Hunter S. Thompson, John Shaft, Chris Rock. He runs a dojo to meet women, invents martial arts like Aztec Karate. He specializes in unusual dangerous and difficult cases, never does missing persons cases because most PI novels are missing persons cases.

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DF: Where is Peter Surf going as a character and what are your future plans for him?

RE: Perfecting the swagger this began with.

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DF: What else are you working on now?

RE: Nothing. For now less writing, more reality.

DF: What is the one book of yours you would recommend to someone to start with? And why that book?

RE: Pick the description you find hottest, work your way to the coolest. Or vice versa.

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DF: What keeps you motivated to continue to write?

RE: My aspiration to build a series of at least 20 dope Peter Surf units, a collection of WTF? to one day gaze upon with chill self-gratification.

DF: Drop some much needed Words of Wisdom on all the young aspiring writers reading this that are thirsting for knowledge.

RE: Only write what you love most. Be your own favorite writer.

DF: What’s a typical Day In The Life of Raymond Embrack like?

RE: Day trading from a desktop, earning more, losing less, learning by doing, writing my own textbook as I go. Each person has to write their own textbook. Night, that’s another question….

Derrick Ferguson: Anything else we need to know?

Raymond Embrack: No

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Raymond Embrack’s Amazon Page

You Say You Know I Have A Patreon Site But You Don’t Know If You Want To Be A Patron Of Mine? Is THAT What’s Troubling You?

I suppose that out of the many reasons that I’m not yet rich and famous, the fact that I’m notorious lousy at promotion is either #1 or #2. I seem to have this unreasonable faith/belief that those who want to find my work will find it, one way or another. That includes my Patreon site. While you may know I have one you may not know exactly what content is available to you there. Okay, we can take care of that right now and hopefully the information I’m about to impart to you will assist you in making an informed decision as to you becoming a Patron of mine or not.

Let’s start with the crown jewel of the lot, shall we? If you’re a Dillon fan and haven’t yet signed up to check out Dillon and The Prophecy of Fire then you’ve been missing out on a story that’s got a lot of significant events in Dillon’s life and career that you haven’t been previously privy to. The story is a direct sequel to “Dillon and The Night of The Krampus” and has Dillon taking his longtime friends/sidekicks Reynard Hansen and Wyatt Hyatt along with their newfound friend Professor Ursula Van Houghton to someplace we’ve never seen before: Dillon’s Pennsylvania estate, named Coppereye (an all too obvious homage to Ian Fleming’s Caribbean estate, “Goldeneye”).

As you can imagine, Reynard and Wyatt are surprised to find out that Dillon has a permanent residence all this time that they’ve never even suspected existed, complete with staff, mind you. But they don’t have much time to catch up before they’re thrown into a mystery involving a sinister cabal of scientists whose dangerous research project involves Vril Energy. Something that Dillon knows far more about than he’s comfortable with.

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The first ten chapters of the story are up now and the conclusion will be posted soon. Then the entire thing will be up until June when a new Dillon serial; “Dillon and The Island of Dr. Mamuwalde” will take over. More about that over at the Dillon blog here where I did an entire entry about the genesis of “Dillon and The Island of Dr. Mamuwalde.” Enjoy.

Diamondback I: It Seemed Like A Good Idea at The Time is a novel with a pretty long history. It’s my attempt to write what I call an “Urban Western.” Which simply means that instead of riding nags and blasting away with six-shooters, the good guys and bad guys drive BMWs, Jaguars and Lamborghinis and shoot each other with automatic weapons. A more detailed description and breakdown of the story can be found here.

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One Night in Denbrook is a work in progress going back to 2009. The origins of the story are mainly because I wanted to see if I could do a prose version of a 1980s Action Movie. That’s all. My aspirations as a writer on this particular piece really don’t go any further than trying to put a movie on paper. Most of you who have been following me for a while and know that I usually say that I consider myself a frustrated film director so One Night in Denbrook is my shot at writing a story visual as I possibly could, throwing in all kinds of off-the-wall characters and situations.

The plot is simple: Denbrook’s criminal element is hunting for the heart of Toulon The Magician, Denbrook’s #1 crime lord and one of the main characters of Diamondback. Some characters who appear in Diamondback also appear in this one as the events of One Night in Denbrook take place before the events of Diamondback. The heart of Toulon falls into the hands of one J. Cadwallander, a cab driver who turns out to have an eclectic and incredibly lethal skill set that no respectable cab driver should have and he spends one wild night trying to stay alive while everybody and their mother is trying to kill him for the heart.

The city of Denbrook was created by one of the most imaginative and creative writers I know. Mike McGee is flat out brilliant. That’s the best I can say about him. I truly appreciate the fact that he created the city of Denbrook and then just turned it over to a bunch of writers to use as we please.

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So that’s it. That’s what up there right now. From time to time I throw up a short story I dig out of my digital files just as a treat and I’m thinking of offering a freebie every now and then just for the fun of it. By all means, if there’s something I can do that would entice you to sign up and become a Patron of mine, by all means let me know here or by email: DerrickFerguson@gmail.com

As always, I thank you for your time and kind patience. Blessings on you, your household and all that live there. Talk to you later.

 

 

Derrick Ferguson Hunts Down The EXILES OF THE DIRE PLANET

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When last we saw Garvey Dire, he was doing pretty well for himself. Oh sure, his mission to Mars had gone wrong, leaving him near death. But then found himself miraculously transported 50,000 years into the past. And in that past, Mars is not a dying planet.  Indeed, it thrives with life including the Muvari tribe which is mostly populated by warrior women.  The males of the tribe are few and are guarded as they assure the continued survival of the tribe.

Garvey survives a number of harrowing adventures to rise to a level of prominence in the Muvari tribe as well as marrying the gorgeous and deadly Ntashia, the finest swordswoman of Mars.  Garvey even managed to prevent World War III back on Earth in his native time period and save the life of his best friend. Salt-N-Pepa could very well have been talking about Garvey in their song “Whatta Man”

When we catch up again with Garvey Dire he’s facing an army of Galbran. They’re a rival tribe of cannibals who have an old score to settle with Garvey and an older one to settle with the Muvari. And while he’s trying to hold off this army in a remote outpost with but a handful of Muvari warrior women, he’s also trying to figure out how to handle the Muvari custom of a man having more than one wife. It’s not as hard one might think since his first wife Ntashia has made the arraignments for the marriage and is actively encouraging it. It’s custom, y’know and when on Mars…hey, do as the Martians do.

It’s almost a relief for Garvey to discover that his old rival and fellow Earthman Arnold Stechter survived the events of “Dire Planet” and is alive and well. He’s lost his memory of his life on Earth and doesn’t recall that he and Garvey are bitter enemies. But Stechter hasn’t forgotten his ambition and desire for power. He has gathered together outcast warrior women from a dozen different tribes and forged them into a savage, bloodthirsty army. And with these EXILES OF THE DIRE PLANET he intends to conquer and rule Mars. But it’s a plan that has to begin with the overthrow of Ledgrim, the hidden Muvari capital city. And it’s Garvey Dire who will unwittingly help Stechter achieve that goal…

If you’ve read and enjoyed “Dire Planet” then you’ll certainly want to read the sequel. Not only does Joel continue to explore and reveal new layers of his Martian culture but he also gives us new layers of his protagonist. Garvey’s naturally hesitant about entering into another marriage when he’s already got a wife he’s perfectly happy with. Garvey Dire exhibits more maturity in this multiple marriage thing than you would expect from a hero in this genre. Garvey’s still learning his role and place in this world and he sometimes wishes things would go a little slower.

One thing he’s not slow at is facing down the hordes of enemies thirsting for his blood in this one. If this book doesn’t have the highest body count of any of Joel’s books, its right up there in the top three. Just the first fifty pages of the book has a higher death rate than most complete novels. And this is before Garvey finds out about Stechter and his army of exiles.

EXILES OF THE DIRE PLANET is an enjoyable book as well as a demanding one.  Joel seems determined to give readers more bang for their buck and while he certainly does that it also means that there’s a lot more you to pay attention to attention to and keep track of. The only complaint I have with the book is that in order to get in as much information as he can, Joel will occasionally have characters explain some aspect of Martian life and culture to Garvey, even during scenes where it seemed to me that concerning themselves with surviving whatever is trying to kill them should be of paramount importance. Also, there’s the character of Naegrik the Galbran. While he provides Garvey with a sidekick who’s just as much of an outsider as he is, Garvey’s acceptance of his conversion from full-blown cannibalism to bosom buddy and lifelong pal is a bit too quick for my taste. But I liked how the other characters kept an eye on Naegrik when he was around and constantly reminded Garvey that this guy grew up eating people.

But the main thing here is the adventure and Joel delivers it with great style and tight control over the half dozen subplots he’s got going. And EXILES OF THE DIRE PLANET ends with a cliffhanger that will demand that you get the third book in the series; “Into The Dire Planet” to find out what happens next.  And for my money that’s exactly what Pulp, whether Classic or New is supposed to do. Enjoy.

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You can find all the books in the “Dire Planet” series and many other fine books by Joel Jenkins HERE