Category: Science Fiction

Kickin’ The Willy Bobo With…Valjeanne Jeffers

Derrick Ferguson: It’s been quite a while since we’ve done this so for the benefit of those who don’t know you (and shame on them!) who is Valjeanne Jeffers?

Valjeanne Jeffers: Greetings sweet readers and authors. I’m the author of nine books, including my most popular Immortal series and Mona Livelong: Paranormal Detective series, as well as one nonfiction book, The Story of Eve, which has only been published as articles. I also co-edited, with Quinton Veal, Scierogenous: An Anthology of Erotic Science Fiction and Fantasy (Volumes I and II). I’ve been published in a number of anthologies, including: The Bright Empire, Fitting In, Black Magic Women, Luminescent Threads, Sycorax’s Daughters and Blerdrotica (in press).

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DF: Where do you live and what do you tell the IRS you do?

VJ: I live in Alabama and I work as a teacher and literary editor. I love editing because I get to read wonderful books, mostly speculative fiction, for free.

DF: So how has the writing thing been going for you since we last talked? You’ve been a busy young lady.

VJ: I wish everything went as smoothly as my writing. There are always marketing headaches when you’re an Indie author. Right now, I’m working on getting all of my books on Barnes & Nobel’s site, and ultimately into their physical stores. I’m hoping that this will be a game changer for my book sales.

DF: Is writing getting easier or harder? Have you made any major changes or adjustments in how you work, where your work or the hours that you work?

VJ: I have to balance my writing with my work schedule, and that part is easier since I now set my own hours. I’ve also found my voice and a ton of support from my writing circle, so I don’t doubt myself as much as I used to. We writers are quirky folks, and it has been so beautiful to find my niche among them.

Yet, writing a book, for me, is like starting journey where you have a general idea of your destination, and no idea how you’re going to get there. It’s like that for me every time. That’s the difficult part. In my latest novel, Mona Livelong: Paranormal Detective III, I tackled some issues that were very close to home, and this too made it harder. But I can see my way to the conclusion of my latest journey.

DF: You’ve been doing this for a goodly amount of time now. Have you found your audience? Or have they found you?

VJ: I believe that I have found my audience. Yet a writer’s work is never done when it comes to discovering new readers. I’m working really hard on getting my books into brick and mortar stores and attending events where I can meet and greet folks. Also, cons and author signings are a lot of fun.

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DF: What are your thoughts on the role and direction of African-American Speculative Fiction written by Women of Color in the past five years?

VJ: I started this journey back in 2007. When I first began writing and reading the only black female authors I knew were: Octavia Butler, Tananarive Due and Nalo Hopkinson. Since then, black women have made tremendous strides as authors, directors and filmmakers. I’m one of the contributing screenwriters for the “7Magpies” horror anthology film, spearheaded by producer and creator, Lucy Cruell. Lucy decided to bring together me, Tananarive Due, Sumiko Saulson, Eden Royce, Crystal Connor, Linda D Addison, and Paula Ashe together as screenwriters to make this project happen, as well as several female directors, including Rae Dawn Chong. This film project has been in the works for a while, but hopefully we’ll see the finished product soon.

DF: I’ve noticed in the past few years you’ve been writing in the genre of Erotic Science Fiction which I didn’t know was a genre until I read some of your stories. Is this a genre we should all be reading?

VJ: I’ve co-edited Scierogenous I and II, and some of the writers in my circle write erotic science fiction, most notably Sumiko Saulson, Quinton Veal and Penelope Flynn. So, I believe that erotic science fiction may be ascending from sub-genre to full-fledged genre status. It ain’t for the faint of heart, but a lot of folks dig it.

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I have a mix-media approach to writing: I write horror, science fiction and fantasy and I adore them all. Derrick, you once referred to my writing style as imaginatively experimental and I love this description. Yet, I don’t consider myself to be an erotic writer. I think of myself as someone who writes stories and novels with erotic elements. Author Milton Davis, when I posed this question to him, told me that if I removed all of the erotic elements from my stories, they would still be solid stories. But, if folks describe me as a writer of erotica, that’s cool. Often, it’s your readers who define your work according to how it moves them. As a case in point, I didn’t consider myself to be a horror writer, until Sumiko Saulson included my Immortal series in “60 Black Women in Horror Fiction” (she has since updated this volume to include 100 writers). I was blown away! And so, I took on the cap of “horror writer” and ran with it. Now, my most popular series is Mona Livelong: Paranormal Detective, a horror/steamfunk series.

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DF: You are a highly prominent and respected female African-American Speculative Fiction writer. At least I think so. But where do you see your place on the field? What position do you hold?

VJ: I graciously accept both titles. I believe that I have reached the point in my writing career where I am both a well-known and respected author. But there are shoulders that I’ve stood on to reach this point in my writing journey, most notably Octavia Butler. Octavia has always been my writing mentor, although I wasn’t fortunate enough to meet her while she was alive. And she continues to inspire me.

Last summer at Blacktasticon 2018, I sat on a panel with some of the heaviest hitters in the black SF community, to discuss Octavia’s writing and the impact that she continues to have on speculative fiction. I was honored to sit beside them. So, as I writer I have arrived, but there’s still room for growth.

DF: What keeps you motivated during creative slumps?

VJ: Octavia Butler has the best recipe for overcoming writers block: “First forget inspiration. Habit is more dependable. Habit will sustain you whether you’re inspired or not. Habit will help you finish and polish your stories. Inspiration won’t. Habit is persistence in practice.” As writers, we have to keep it moving, even through creative slumps. It’s okay to take some time off, to step back and let things simmer for a while. But when I leave my characters for too long, they become strangers, and then I have to go through the process of reacquainting myself with them.

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Also, outlines work best for me, when I find myself writing in circles. Music too, is one of the greatest sources of inspiration for me. I’ve actually created scenes inspired by music. I once wrote a concluding action scene listening to “Rollin Crumblin” and another one listening to “Magic Carpet Ride.” And I listen to all genres of music depending on what mood I’m in: Jazz, Hip Hop, R&B, Blues and Rock.

Lately I’ve been listening to one of my favorite bands (just their music from the ‘70s) WAR

DF: What do you do with your free time when you’re not writing?

VJ: If I’m not writing I’m usually working or reading. I have three books on my kindle that I’m reading (Gerald Coleman’s “Plague of Shadows”, Joe Bonadonna’s “Mad Shadows II”, and Alan D. Jones’ “Blerd Tales”). I’m still working on reading stories from the anthologies I’ve been published in. I recently got my copy of The Bright Empire (edited by Milton Davis and Gene Peterson) and the first story I read was Balogun Ojetade’s “The Transmission of Aragomago;” it’s outstanding. I also just finished reading Nicole Kurtz’s story “Belly Talker” (from the Blacktasticon Anthology edited by Milton Davis) which is also off the chain. And I have a few favorite TV programs that I watch, or I try to catch a decent SF/fantasy movie.

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DF: Tell us about your upcoming projects. What can we look forward to from Valjeanne Jeffers in 2019?

VJ: I’m currently writing Mona Livelong: Paranormal Detective III: The Case of the Vanishing Child. I should be finished by late Spring or early summer. And I’ve been toying with the idea of writing a children’s novel based on my short story, “The Visitor” (which was very well received). But I won’t tackle this until I finish Mona Livelong III. Author and artist Penelope Flynn is releasing an anthology of erotic science science, Blerdrotica, and my story “Aura’s Awakening” will be included, and I am very excited about it.

DF: Drop some Words of Wisdom on all the aspiring young writers out there reading this and thirsting for your knowledge.

VJ: My advice to all new authors is read books in your genre, or just read. Read the authors you admire and don’t worry if your words don’t sound like theirs. Variety is the sugar and spice of life, so find your own voice and write! Once you put pen to paper, you are a writer, no matter what anyone says.

DF: What is the one story or novel of yours that you would recommend that we should start with?

VJ: If your taste is Fantasy/Afrofuturism with a dash of Horror start with Immortal. If you prefer your Horror/Steamfunk straight with no chaser, start with Mona Livelong: Paranormal Detective: The Case of the Angry Ghost.

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DF: What’s a Typical Day In The Life of Valjeanne Jeffers like?

VJ: Normally my days consist of writing, reading and playing with my grand babies – who are playing with my dog Caesar and my cat Cleo. I usually teach in the evenings, unless I’m editing a novel.

Derrick Ferguson: Anything else we should know?

Valjeanne Jeffers: I’d like to thank you Derrick, pulp writer extraordinaire, for interviewing me! And I wish everyone love, peace and creativity.

You’re one click away from Valjeanne’s Amazon Page. Be sure to go check it out, y’hear?
Valjeanne is active on Facebook and Twitter so if you’d like to talk to her directly, start there.

 

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Kickin’ The Willy Bobo With…Christofer Nigro

Derrick Ferguson: Who is Christofer Nigro and what are you all about?

Christofer Nigro: I am a humble Italian writer born and raised on the mean streets of a big city in New York State, but not fortunate enough for that big city to be the one that shares a name with the state itself and is associated with an apple and the Empire State Building. So, I’ve had to make do. Sometimes very opinionated, sometimes not funny when I try to be (okay, maybe more than just sometimes *sigh*), and always hoping to tell a good story. On pen and paper, or the modern digital equivalent thereof, that is.

I am a lifelong fan of the fantastic fiction genres, particularly those we all know as horror, sci-fi, fantasy, pulp adventure, superheroes, tokasatsu, and yes, crime noir. I have always been fascinated by the inherent subversive and larger than life nature of these genres. Hence, they are my own favorite way to tell stories, for imagining a more exciting and interesting variation of the world we live in, for pushing the limits of scientific and theological thinking; and ultimately, what they say about our culture’s vision of that which passes for heroism, villainy, the expected future, ideas of the past, what could be, and what actually is via the dynamic interplay of archetypes – some of them unique to the industrial age, others being  post-industrial versions of age-old epitomes. As in, the ancient world had Hercules and Thor, and we in the post-industrial era have Superman and Shazam. And we also still have Hercules and Thor! How awesome is that for the best of both worlds?

As such, it has been a lifelong dream of mine to add my own two or three cents to this literary mix. Hopefully, Wild Hunt Press will end up adding a silver dollars’ worth of that metaphorical currency. Stranger things have happened.

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DF: Where do you live and what do you tell the IRS you do for a living?

CN: I live in Buffalo, New York and I tell them I am running a business that I hope takes off like a business, but must have an accountant figure out what I owe nevertheless. Owing nothing is great, but that suggests you’re making next to nothing, which is not so great. I think you get the gist. I also take into account all freelance work I do, including the writing assignments I complete for other publishing companies which I get paid for, however meager said payments happen to be.

DF: How long have you been writing? And what is your motivation for writing?

CN: I have been attempting to write since I was five years old, when I stapled together a very crude little book about dinosaurs. My love of dinosaurs is reflected in much of my writing today. During my early elementary school years I attempted to put together horribly rendered comic books drawn into loose-leaf notebooks featuring various superheroes — I recall trying to do a “split book” featuring the Hulk and the Sub-Mariner, a concept of publication that always fascinated me but which has long since gone out of vogue – and one featuring Doc Savage, a classic pulp hero I came to know and become fascinated with due to the rather awesome black and white comic magazine version published by Marvel back in the day.

My first honest-to-goddess short story was one called “Evil of the Wolf Man,” which I penned in sixth grade, featuring some werewolf character whose identity I do not recall pitted against a vampiric villain I called Dr. Morbius. A name I shamelessly stole from Marvel’s vampiric anti-hero, I should fess up to. I remember being so proud of that story that I actually gave it to my grandmother to read and assess, not caring about all the explicit cuss words it had. To her credit, she read and evaluated it without making nary a complaint about all the expletives and f-bombs in the dialogue.

I wrote continuously through my high school and college years, finally getting a few things published locally in the late ‘90s when I published two editions of my college journal The Poet for academic credit (I majored in English during my second and successful attempt at obtaining a Bachelor of Arts degree). It was no big deal in retrospect, to be honest, but it was one of those things that seemed big to an aspiring writer at the time.

My first official published work was a short story in Volume 8 of Black Coat Press’s annual Tales of the Shadowmen anthology in 2010 (featuring new tales of pulp heroes and villains from vintage French literature and cinema), and I will be forever grateful to Jean-Marc Lofficier for believing in me and giving me this first big break. Much as I am likewise grateful to Tommy Hancock of Pro Se Press, Nicholas Ahlhelm of Pulp Empire, and the crew at Sirens Call Publications for giving me similar early breaks as a published author. And finally, the crew at Severed Press for publishing my first two novels.

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I am also forever indebted to Win Scott Eckert, Chuck Loridans, and other authors from the Wold Newton circle of successors to the groundbreaking work of the late, great Philip Jose Farmer for providing me with so much inspiration and the networking that eventually made it possible for me to get published.

What is my motivation? To achieve the type of immortality that most people crave, but usually attempt to achieve simply by passing on their DNA to a new generation of people bearing their surname. In the case of authors, we hope to pass on our ideas and psychic creations to successive generations. I also simply love doing it, I enjoy doing my best to make a difference and impact on the world via the written word, and I cannot think of a better form of hard work that is suited to me as an individual.

DF: What have you learned about yourself through your writing?

CN: Well, for one thing, I learned that I have a habit of making overly long sentences with a lack of finesse for brevity, which has driven some of my editors crazy at times. Which has in turn taught me to be very appreciative of their efforts and patience, which I like to think has been carried over to my own work as an editor.

I learned how important perseverance and determination are to human achievement, not to mention the requirement of having a thick skin for when the inevitable negative reviews and criticism of your work come in. Not to mention the rejections.  I always wondered if I could handle these things and learn the discipline required to be prolific and successful in this field. Sometimes I still wonder, but so far, so good, I like to say.

I also learned that, thankfully, I am capable of pushing myself to do things I enjoy doing, even when the going gets rough. I was stoked to discover this, considering how poorly motivated I am to do things that need to be done but which I am not quite so fond of doing. Like managing time, cleaning up the potato chip crumbs I left all over my carpet following a snack, and making those dentist appointments.

Most importantly, I also learned that there is indeed a field where being opinionated, having a lot to say about a lot of things, and providing a sounding board for my ideas is useful rather than counter-productive. Well, most of the time, anyway. These days we live in a world predominated by political correctness, so not all opinions are welcome. However, writers are supposed to be subversive, and supposed to make people think when they do not want to. It can be nice to know you are providing a service that society needs, even though it’s one they often do not want. That is part of the risk this particular field entails.

People have a strong psychological requirement of feeling needed. But they also like to feel wanted, and this is a field where you quickly learn you cannot have everything.

So, one thing you quickly find out about yourself with writing is whether you prefer to play it safe and simply be entertaining, which writers can certainly do to great success; or try to say something about the world we live in and hopefully do so in an entertaining way, which can be quite dangerous. Not only to society, but to you. So, in some ways, being a writer helps you test your mettle against the world around you and see how often you can get up again after being knocked down. Not to mention learning to struggle in a field that, contrary to popular outside belief, is notoriously difficult to make a good living from. This forces us to ask whether making a lot of money is truly the sole measure of accomplishment or success in the world we know.

DF: How much room in your head do you allow do you allow for critics and criticism?

CN: I try to leave quite a bit in there for that, because writers (and all creatives, of course) have to be prepared for a lot of serious criticism – both personally from friends and editors, and publicly via critics you do not know. In fact, you need to be prepared for a serious public drubbing at times. You quickly learn that this is not work for sissies, because you must leave yourself vulnerable and open to public scrutiny.

Are there times when I want to give up after I get the latest bad review or drubbing that is visible for all to see? Of course. Until several minutes of teeth gnashing pass and you realize these types of psychological beatings and public verbal floggings are a routine occupational hazard for writers. Much like carpal tunnel syndrome is.

Of course, there are different types of criticism, with varying degrees of value. Constructive criticism that is genuine is a blessing despite the pain involved in receiving it, because it can tell you what your specific weaknesses are in storytelling, and what you should work on to improve your craft.

Ironic criticism, i.e., light-hearted roasting, is also to be expected, and I think, useful. It teaches you to be humble and not to take things too seriously all the time. This is good for your ego, as it keeps you grounded and resistant to becoming too full of yourself for each success you may achieve.

Derogatory criticism, that which is clearly designed just to be nasty and make someone feel bad about themselves, is not helpful. However, it is also an occupational hazard you have to expect and learn to deal with when you put yourself out there like creatives do. For instance, when I get a negative review that simply says, “Do not buy this book! It was awful, and if you must read it, see if you can rent it or borrow it for free. But do not spend any money on it!” … and nothing other than that, they are not helping either you or their fellow readers understand why they are feeling that way, or what you, as a writer, may need to improve on. They are just taking jabs at you with no real point behind it except to vent over feeling they wasted their time and money on your work.

I also have a pet peeve for nitpickers, because I believe all readers should not expect any work to be perfect and without a few nits to pick, especially considering how writers already have to take a lot of criticism for often genuinely serious matters. Adding a few kicks to a flurry of punches can be perceived as adding insult to a bullet wound, even if that initial shot to the gut was necessary. Kicking a guy after he is already laying there in a pool of his own blood is arguably not particularly necessary.

And of course, there are some people who find it easier to be critical than to say positive things even if they honestly feel more positive than negative feedback was warranted. And there are those critics who feel it’s simply their job to tear things apart rather than to criticize in a balanced fashion. Then there are those who dislike what you wrote because they may have picked up your book with a specific set of expectations that you never intended to meet.

So, again, criticism is a thing a writer must be prepared for, and something he/she needs to steel him/herself against no matter how much it may sting or be the written equivalent of a kick to the diaphragm. I try to take the genuine constructive criticism to heart for the useful and necessary feedback it is, and inure myself against the nitpicking, pointless “venting” critiques, and outright mean-spirited attacks while taking the constructive criticism to heart in the proper spirit for which it was generously offered. It’s going to come, and you have to be ready for it, just as a construction worker needs to wear that metal safety helmet in preparation of getting hit on the noggin from a metal bolt dropped from a hundred feet up.

One important thing I try to keep in mind, which all writers must, is that it’s utterly impossible to please everyone. One thing you are likely to notice with your reviews is that the things which some readers hated about your story/book are precisely the things that others absolutely loved about it. What is “good” or “bad” is often very subjective, and readers have a variety of aesthetic and stylistic tastes.

This is why, as an editor and publisher, I try to accept all professionally rendered submissions even if they happen to have a style or method of storytelling that I do not personally like. Because I know its very likely many readers will indeed like the work, even if I and certain other readers may not.

DF: What’s with the obsession with The Wold Newton Universe?

CN: The idea of a shared universe where many characters and concepts created by a vast array of writers, illustrators, game designers, etc., co-exist side-by-side and can actually run into each other just as surely as you and I can in the world outside our window is fascinating to many. As is the idea of a world, an entire universe, that is shaped by the activities and consequences of this multitude of exceptional beings and events while still reasonably resembling the one we know (and sometimes love) is ripe for creative inspiration and ruminations on how much more interesting the world we live in could be if only this or that physical law was a bit laxer.

Which one of these many extraordinary personages may be related without anyone – including possibly their own creators or original writers – knowing about it? Which of them may have contributed actions that beget or aided and abetted the life story of another personage, or this or that significant event, recorded in disparate sources by other writers? What type of hidden world or sequence of events would result from the sum of their various actions, independent or otherwise, over the course of that secret history going on alongside an analogue of the one we know?

It takes a lot of overthinking, yes, and it’s certainly not for every writer or consumer of genre fiction. But for those of us who find it a useful and interesting mental exercise to conceive of such a world, it can be quite fun and creatively inspiring to dwell on. And yes, maybe even obsessive. I am certainly one of the guilty parties in that regard.

For many, the Wold Newton Universe was the Holy Grail that got the New Pulp Movement started in many ways. Or, at least those of us fascinated with para-scholarship that seeks out hidden connections dispersed throughout a huge number of sources, sometimes via a variety of creative mediums outside of prose, both intentional and perceived.

There are actually a lot of intentional and semi-intentional “Easter Eggs” in the form of cross-source references, some blatant and others subtle/merely implied, thrown into works intended to make connections to others. This includes sources composed by entirely different creative teams from a variety of eras. Seeking these little gems out and making further connections for inclusion in the overall tapestry of a shared universe is the basis of a literary methodology that Win Scott Eckert christened ‘creative mythography’ (I strongly believe it was Win who coined the term, but if I am misremembering, I have no problem with being corrected).

The Wold Newton Universe is specifically Win Scott Eckert’s extension of the shared pulp universe connections conceived by the great sci-fi and pulp adventure author Philip Jose Farmer, largely within his para-biographies Tarzan Alive and Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life, as well as further short stories, articles, and other works by PJF. This was primarily embodied in the Wold Newton Family, a group of famous pulp heroes and villains of yesteryear who were genetically connected as a result of a few horse-driven carriages of their ancestors being irradiated by the mysterious energies of a meteor that landed in a field located within Wold Newton, Yorkshire, England circa 1795 (hence, the name of both that lineage and the shared universe it occurred within). The Wold Newton Universe was further added to and extrapolated upon between the late 1990s and mid-2000s by the creative inspiration of Chuck Loridans with the original MONSTAAH site, Dennis Power with his Secret History of the Wold Newton Universe site, and numerous other dabblers contributing articles to these sites (including yours truly).

After several years, it was decided by Win that the term “Wold Newton Universe” should be reserved for PJF’s specific oeuvre of work, or those directly connected to it by his successors. This is because the term “Wold Newton” was derived from PJF’s work and was not entirely about crossovers, which the expanded view of the Wold Newton Universe became associated with. Win therefore differentiated the expanded shared universe that incorporated the numerous additions extrapolated from crossover refs that were well outside of PJF’s personal body of work as, appropriately enough, the Crossover Universe. He provided a timeline for the Crossover Universe, now officially coined as such, in two big great volumes of Crossovers: A Secret Chronology of The World, followed up by two additional and similarly impressive  authorized volumes of Crossover Expanded by Sean Levin.

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The idea of a shared universe where many characters and concepts created by a vast array of writers, illustrators, game designers, etc., co-exist side-by-side and can actually run into each other just as surely as you and I can in the world outside our window is fascinating to many. As is the idea of a world, an entire universe, that is shaped by the activities and consequences of this multitude of exceptional beings and events while still reasonably resembling the one we know (and sometimes love) is ripe for creative inspiration and ruminations on how much more interesting the world we live in could be if only this or that physical law was a bit more lax.

Which one of these many extraordinary personages may be related without anyone – including possibly their own creators or original writers – knowing about it? Which of them may have contributed actions that beget or aided and abetted the life story of another personage, or this or that significant event, recorded in disparate sources by other writers? What type of hidden world or sequence of events would result from the sum of their various actions, independent or otherwise, over the course of that secret history going on alongside an analogue of the one we know?

It takes a lot of overthinking, yes, and it’s certainly not for every writer or consumer of genre fiction. But for those of us who find it a useful and interesting mental exercise to conceive of such a world, it can be quite fun and creatively inspiring to dwell on. And yes, maybe even obsessive. I am certainly one of the guilty parties in that regard.

For many, the Wold Newton Universe was the Holy Grail that got the New Pulp Movement started in many ways. Or, at least those of us fascinated with para-scholarship that seeks out hidden connections dispersed throughout a huge number of sources, sometimes via a variety of creative mediums outside of prose, both intentional and perceived.

There are actually a lot of intentional and semi-intentional “Easter eggs” in the form of cross-source references, some blatant and others subtle/merely implied, thrown into works intended to make connections to others. This includes sources composed by entirely different creative teams from a variety of eras. Seeking these little gems out and making further connections for inclusion in the overall tapestry of a shared universe is the basis of a literary methodology that Win Scott Eckert christened creative mythography (I strongly believe it was Win who coined the term, but if I am misremembering, I have no problem with being corrected).

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The Wold Newton Universe is specifically Win Scott Eckert’s extension of the shared pulp universe connections conceived by the great sci-fi and pulp adventure author Philip Jose Farmer, largely within his para-biographies Tarzan Alive and Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life, as well as further short stories, articles, and other works by PJF. This was primarily embodied in the Wold Newton Family, a group of famous pulp heroes and villains of yesteryear who were genetically connected as a result of a few horse-driven carriages of their ancestors being irradiated by the mysterious energies of a meteor that landed in a field located within Wold Newton, Yorkshire, England circa 1795 (hence, the name of both that lineage and the shared universe it occurred within). The Wold Newton Universe was further added to and extrapolated upon between the late 1990s and mid-2000s by the creative inspiration of Chuck Loridans with the original MONSTAAH site, Dennis Power with his Secret History of the Wold Newton Universe site, and numerous other dabblers contributing articles to these sites (including yours truly).

After several years, it was decided by Win that the term “Wold Newton Universe” should be reserved for PJF’s specific oeuvre of work, or those directly connected to it by his successors. This is because the term “Wold Newton” was derived from PJF’s work and was not entirely about crossovers, which the expanded view of the Wold Newton Universe became associated with. Win therefore differentiated the expanded shared universe that incorporated the numerous additions extrapolated from crossover refs that were well outside of PJF’s personal body of work as, appropriately enough, the Crossover Universe. He provided a timeline for the Crossover Universe, now officially coined as such, in two big great volumes of Crossovers: A Secret Chronology of the World, followed up by two additional and similarly impressive authorized volumes of Crossovers Expanded by Sean Levin.

This is where the differentiation stands today, though of course many fans and creative mythographers are still in the habit of referring to the Crossover Universe as the “Wold Newton Universe” out of sheer habit, something I was guilty of a long time myself. But the current distinction is important to note.

And from there lies the genesis of the Wild Hunt Universe, as I call it. Back in the day, such an expansive concept as the Wold Newton Universe (before it became dis-entangled from what would eventually be called the Crossover Universe) obviously led to a host of disagreements and creative differences among numerous creative mythographers and pulp fiction fans as to what should or should not be included within its shared framework, and what might or might not appropriately fit into what was essentially a universe of pulp heroes/villains and monsters/horror heroes. The divide was crossed at many different lines, so many of us developed what back then we would call a “personal Wold Newton Universe,” whereas the one authorized by Win and his main fellow curators was often referred to as the “consensus Wold Newton Universe.”

Obviously, the expected creative differences, be they subtle or extensive, between such a large pool of authors and researchers resulted in a multitude of alternate variations of the Wold Newton Universe/Crossover Universe. Think of what Krona in the DC Universe did to create the Pre-Crisis Multiverse (before it was temporarily wiped out a few times and brought back again via Crisis after Crisis), only a lot less cosmic, and with we creative mythographers to blame for it rather than a rogue alien scientist.

Out of that cosmic catastrophe of creative conflicts came the Wild Hunt Universe. Among others. So, now we have another new multiverse. It’s getting crowded out there. Hence, while the Wild Hunt Universe is not the same as the Crossover Universe, it is a similar variation of it in that it is first and foremost a pulp hero and monster universe but may include or dispense of some elements known to exist in the Crossover Universe proper.

DF: Tell us about Wild Hunt Press.

CN: It is, plain and simple, my dream. I hope to one day make a living off my writing as do so many of us in this racket, and to help many other authors and artists do the same with an indie niche of my own in the field. One that is inundated with my way of doing things and building from there with the contributions of others.

Like many indie imprints, I hope to experiment and publish works that the big labels would deem “too risky” or “not commercial enough” and see what may actually click with the readers. As well as some publications that are not subject to the too-common PC rules of many other indie publishers. There is too much of that right now, as I see it. Sometimes you have to risk offending people to get them thinking, to expand boundaries, and to provide something new or a serious exchange of ideas; otherwise, no matter the quality of the work you publish, you end up fading into the crowd. Not that taking risks is necessarily the road to success, as that can break you as well as make you if all doesn’t go well, but part of the risk in doing something new is, well, taking these risks in the first place.

I will be focusing heavily on the genres I most like to read/view and write myself: horror, sci-fi, fantasy, tokasatsu, crime noir, and pulp adventure fiction. But I am hoping to expand into more experimental territory and play with other genres outside of the above from time to time and see what comes of it.

I will publish my own novels and single-author anthologies, those of others, and multi-author anthologies. Some of these works will be my own take on concepts others have published, and in other cases going in directions that no one has ever gone before. Hopefully.

DF: Tell us about The Warp Event Universe.

CN: This is distinct from the Wild Hunt Universe, which is essentially a pulp /monster/sci-fi universe, a similar variation on the Crossover Universe as noted above. In contrast, the Warp Event Universe will be an actual shared superhero universe. This will be an Earth whose history was very much like the world outside our window, save for a series of periodically occurring mysterious flashes of cosmic energy in the near-vicinity of the planet. They hit very localized areas across the globe, and when they do, the physical laws of that part of the universe changes so that what was previously improbable now becomes nightmarishly likely.

Many people caught in the energy surges of the Warp Events begin developing metahuman powers, on a world where they previously existed only in comic books or on film etc. Some of them change in cool and spectacular ways, others that are actually disturbing and even horrific. Certain animals caught in the Warp Events mutate into strange creatures; certain locales have a dimensional breach punched in time/space that permit access to other dimensions, with strange beings entering this reality from another… some of them may become heroes themselves, and others something decidedly different. And to top it off, exotic forms of technology that wouldn’t work previously suddenly become functional and viable – everything from suits of power-conferring armor, to plasma rifles, to sentient robots.

In short, a once more or less mundane Earth like our own suddenly becomes an amazing, much more interesting, and often outright terrifying place. The corporations and governments of the world respond accordingly, particularly the armed forces and various mercenary guilds, each hoping to study and exploit all of the above phenomena to their advantage. The various publications taking place in this shared universe will show the trials and tribulations of various individuals who are struggling to become heroes after ascending into metahumanity, or deciding to use their powers for very different purposes; or beings from beyond who suddenly gain access to this brave new world from another world; or simply striving to oppose or gain some measure of control over these forces.

The first two published novels in the Warp Event Universe, both written by me, are Centurion: Dark Genesis and Moonstalker: A Knight in Buffalo. Also taking place in the Warp Event Universe is my short story “An Un-Bear-Able Day in Cuyahoga” featuring my teen hero duo Moth Girl & Locust Lad, published in the multi-author superhero anthology The Good Fight 4: Homefront by Local Hero Press. They will soon get their own novel published by Wild Hunt Press.

Granted, the first batch of these heroes are teens, but all similarity between them ends beyond that. And future heroes and villains I have planned for the Warp Event Universe will not be limited to teens. One of them will be Ultimus, an adult who becomes the premiere superhero of  that world and respected by most for his genuine and inspiring nobility… but only because the public is unaware of his rather bizarre secret. Another will be Mr. Mystik, an otherworldly master of magick who enters the Warp Event Universe through a dimensional portal and attempts to protect the people of Earth from the various phenomena that has also bridged the gap between worlds… except that his system of ethics conflicts with that of the human race in some rather unsettling ways. And yes, a team featuring many of these heroes is also planned along the way.

For the record, Centurion is an emotionally troubled young teen who is suddenly beset with extraordinary powers due to being suffused in the energies of a local Warp Event. It’s his intention to become the type of hero he had always admired in the comic books, but the serious emotional scars he carries as a result of being a severely bullied social outcast causes him to lash out in ways that make him as great a menace as the Warp Event-spawned threats he tries to oppose.

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Moonstalker is another teen hero who inhabits the same city as Centurion but is without superhuman powers. Rather, he has extremely formidable martial arts training and other skills & various weaponry related to that, and he takes up the mantle of a ninja-like vigilante to launch a brutal one-man war against a dangerous street gang that seeks to rule Buffalo’s East Side. The only thing is, Moonstalker’s ego is every bit as large as his set of martial arts skills and he believes he can control the East Side in a more benevolent fashion than the gangs. And then there is the matter of the several copycat vigilantes who begin springing up in the wake of his reputation, along with the fact that the police want to take down Moonstalker as much as the street gang itself.

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DF: How difficult was it creating your own superhero universe?

CN: It was something I definitely had to do some planning on. Centurion and Moonstalker are actually updated versions of characters I created way back during my high school years, and I had written some short stories and dossiers featuring these early versions of the characters. I even published one story for each of them locally — one in my aforementioned college journal The Poet (where Moonstalker appeared under his original name of Nightstalker, before I became convinced that moniker was much too ‘taken”); and the Centurion story in the first issue of a long gone, locally published zine that was called The Rebel’s Advocate. The new versions are updated so their stories take place in the 2010s. So now, each will be able to make use of an incredible technological breakthrough known as cell phones, devices unavailable to their earlier versions.

As you may surmise, I have long wanted to put these characters into official publication, and it’s far past the time that it finally happened. There are many superhero universes in prose right now, with the various authors going in some wild directions, whereas others take a more traditional route. Will the Warp Universe stand out amongst this mighty crowd? I do not by any means consider myself a superior writer to the many awesome authors of superhero prose fiction contributing to the market right now (many of whom are terrific inspirations to me). However, I am hoping that the characters and universe under my pen and editorial hand provide something unique and special to that market, much as all the other superhero characters and universes guided by other authors and editors are providing their own unique offerings. Is there room for all of us? Well, it’s a mighty big multiverse out there, so I like to think so.

What I had to really think about is whether or not this shared universe would be united by a specific source that connected virtually every instance of metahuman powers and strange phenomena, as was the case with Marvel’s old New Universe experiment (remember that? I sure do!); or, would multiple fantastic phenomena that are oftentimes unconnected to each other form the backdrop, as with the Marvel Universe proper. I ultimately decided on the former, with the obvious hope that this universe thrives better than the one whose basic premise partially inspired it. However, the heroes of the Warp Event Universe will often be much more powerful than the likes of D.P.7 and Psi-Force from the New Universe, and a wider range of phenomena will erupt from the Warp Events, including other dimensional sentient beings, actual supernatural monsters, and truly advanced technology (including fully sentient machines).

I also had to ask myself this: Do I want characters who are essentially people first, and heroes second (as was most often the case in Marvel’s Ultimate Universe), thus providing good-intentioned albeit highly flawed individuals we can all relate to? Or, have a universe full of essentially noble and selfless heroes of the traditional sort that inspire us? I decided to go for both of the above, and everything in between and outside any definition of “hero” altogether. Secondly, do I go for a grim and gritty tone, or something more fun and light-hearted? I again opted for variance in accordance with varied taste among the readers, with Centurion and Moonstalker being grim and rather dark characters, but Moth Girl & Locust Lad being heroes whose exploits and overall tone puts the word “fun” back in the superhero genre.

DF: Tell us about DORIAN GRAY: DARKER SHADES

CN: This is a multi-author anthology designed to deal with what was, prior to Halloween 2018, a glaring omission in the world of gothic horror: the utter lack of original prose tales featuring Dorian Gray, one of the most intriguing and versatile characters (from a storytelling point of view) in the history of fantastic fiction. And certainly, Oscar Wilde’s greatest creation.

Dorian Gray has been featured in movies, TV shows, video games, comic books, an excellent audio series from Big Finish – but no original prose, save for a duplicate of the novel that features additional erotica so that some of his hornier fans no longer had to rely on their imagination to fill in the gaps (pun not intended, honest!). Other than that, we had a good number of novels and anthologies that featured alternate reality versions of Gray or stories inspired by the concept behind the character, but no original prose that continues the actual saga begun in “The Picture of Dorian Gray.”

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This anthology rectifies that rather inexplicable oversight. It features contributions from some of the best authors in horror fiction today, including none other than Peter Rawlik, Micah Harris, and the legendary comic book writer T. Casey Brennan (his first officially published prose to my knowledge). And more, including a novella from yours truly, a new short story by Kevin Heim, and a short one act play (just call it a playlet) by playwright David MacDowell Blue. The volume tops off with an extensive Dorian Gray timeline chronicling his history in the Wild Hunt Universe, culled from numerous sources across all mediums, and it’s co-authored by Robert E. Wronski Jr. (who provided the framework) and moi (who provided a bunch of extrapolations to Rob’s work).

Oh, and for crossover fanatics, the various tales feature Dorian Gray meeting up with the likes of Dracula, Dr. Pretorius, Becky Sharp (of Vanity Fair), Carmilla (of Sheridan Le Fanu’s classic eponymous vampire novella), Richard Pickman of the classic Lovecraftian tale “Pickman’s Model,” and… well, you’ll see!

DF: Tell us about THE EXPERIMENT

CN: This is a linear, multi-author anthology of separate but interconnected stories that is the brainchild of author Zach Cole. It occurs in a reality distinct from the Wild Hunt or Warp Event Universes, as well as Zach’s Blue Moon Universe where the novels featuring his monster hunting werewolf Jeremy Walker and the heroic daikaiju Marugrah take place. But it’s definitely a horror universe, and when Zach gets around to giving it a name, I’ll let you know!

The initial framing story, penned by Zach, features a black ops bio-weapons program called Project Hydra that is sequestered in the notorious Area 51 military facility at Groom Lake, Nevada. Basically, this top-secret program had the goal of creating six distinct and ultra-deadly new lifeforms created by splicing various genetic combinations of some of Earth’s most dangerous predatory animals with strands of alien DNA recovered from a crashed spacecraft. The resulting Subjects were supposed to be under the control of the U.S. Armed Forces for use as biological weapons on the battlefield. Of course, as is often the case with such things, plans go horribly awry, all six of the Subjects break free from the base after first going on a bloody rampage inside of the facility itself, and promptly go their separate ways to find refuge throughout the hidden byways of Nevada (and even beyond the state’s borders, as you will see).

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What follows are short stories and novellas scribed by different authors, including Zach and yours truly, which chronicle the bloody havoc wreaked on the lives of different groups of unwary civilians who come into contact with each one of the monstrous Subjects of Project Hydra; along with the efforts of special task force units of armored soldiers sent from Area 51 to track down and neutralize the incredibly dangerous creatures. And it ends with a final framing tale co-authored by Zach and yours truly that shows the aftermath of these events, along with revealing the plans that the Area 51 bureaucracy have in dealing with the residual problems left over from Project Hydra.

This anthology features the debut of several new authors, and I am proud to provide them with an outlet for some of their first published work.

DF: So where does Wild Hunt Press go from here?

CN: I can only hope it will go where successful small indie publishing efforts go. Towards that end, I will continue to strive to do what indie publishers do best: bring experimental genre titles to readers, to help many new professionally qualified authors and artists get the big break they need and deserve, and to put my own stamp on it in the process. One of those tasks that sounds simple when described, but is actually not quite so simple in practice, of course. But here’s to the effort!

DF: What’s an average Day In The Life of Christofer Nigro like?

CN: Dealing with whatever life may throw at you, much like everyone else. More specifically for a typical day, a lot of reading (and trying to become faster at it!), listening to music, drinking coffee, Green tea, or soda (whichever I most have a fancy for that day), and doing my share of writing, editing, formatting, discussing project ideas with contributing authors and artists, and hopefully treating myself to a pizza on that particular day.

Derrick Ferguson: Anything else we need to know?

Christofer Nigro: One other major thing! Wild Hunt Press is honored to have a collusion with author/artist Zach Cole, the scribe of the A Jeremy Walker Thriller series, the mastermind behind Wild Hunt’s just published linear horror anthology The Experiment, and with more from him to come under the Wild Hunt imprint, including Legion: A Thriller, Lovecraft: A Kaiju Thriller, and new editions of his first kaiju and Jeremy Walker novels that comprise his Blue Moon Universe. As for the immediate present, The Titans’ Children, Zach’s newest novel in the saga of Jeremy Walker, monster hunting werewolf, and Marugrah, his heroic kaiju, is now on sale from Wild Hunt Press.

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Derrick Ferguson Takes Aim At THE AVENGERS: TOO MANY TARGETS

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By John Peel and Dave Rogers

Mass Market Paperback: 224 pages

Publisher: Tor Books; 1st edition (June 15, 1998)

ISBN-10: 0812589092

ISBN-13: 978-0812589092

Mention The Avengers to your average Joe or Jane Punchclock and they’ll most likely assume that you must be talking about the blockbuster movies featuring a team of Marvel superheroes. And they’re right. But there’s another team of Avengers that has just as loyal following as those other Avengers ever since the 1960’s. The British TV series THE AVENGERS starred Patrick Macnee as John Steed. Originally, he wasn’t the main character. That was Dr. David Keel played by Ian Hendry. THE AVENGERS started out as pretty much a straight up crime drama but that changed once Steed became the main character and was partnered up with a succession of beautiful assistants. Women whose names soon became legendary due to their intelligence, sophistication, style, talents and abilities that made them easily as equal as their male partner out in the field. Cathy Gale (Honor Blackman) Emma Peel (Diana Rigg) and Tara King (Linda Thorson) worked with Steed for a shadowy branch of the British Secret Service (given the name of “The Ministry” in the disastrous 1998 movie) combating enemies that became more bizarre the longer the series ran.

Robotics, time travel, mind control, invisibility, super computers wanting to take over the world, The Hellfire Club (a concept borrowed for Marvel Comics “X-Men” series) mad scientists…THE AVENGERS had all that and more, incorporating elements of science fiction, satire, parody, droll British wit flavored with eccentricity into an entertaining one hour package that ran from 1961 to 1969. There also was “The New Avengers” which ran from 1976 to 1977 that saw John Steed with two new partners played by Joanna Lumley and Gareth Hunt.

We won’t talk about the movie, okay with you?

But what I would like to talk about is THE AVENGERS: TOO MANY TARGETS. Judging from the date I’m assuming it was published to compliment the feature film. One has to wonder why there wasn’t a proper movie tie-in novelization but in this case I’m glad there wasn’t. THE AVENGERS: TOO MANY TARGETS is just fine the way it is.  It’s not a masterpiece and it’s not a book that I insist that you actually have to read but if you’re a long-time fan of the series then you’ll have a good time with this.

Somebody is going around killing agents of The Ministry. Somebody that looks a whole lot like John Steed. And he’s not a fake. Thanks to computerized voice analysis there can be no doubt. It actually is Steed. And considering his knowledge and experience, a rogue Steed is the greatest threat imaginable to British Intelligence. A reluctant Tara King is giving the assignment to eliminate him.

But while this is going on, Steed is contacted by a retired colleague who gives Steed a special assignment that comes right from The Prime Minister himself: Steed’s superior, codenamed ‘Mother’ has apparently gone rogue and is killing his own agents. Steed is given the assignment to eliminate him.

Now believe it or not, this all ties in with a wild gorilla roaming the English countryside being hunted by Cathy Gale and Dr. David Keel’s investigation into a lethal plague rampaging through the African nation of Katawa. All of these diverse threads lead everybody to Knight Industries, owned and run by Mrs. Emma Peel as apparently Knight Industries is the new birthplace of the deadliest foes The Avengers ever faced: The Cybernauts. Before, Steed and Mrs. Peel barely survived their encounters with the murderous robots. Now they have to face a new generation of Cybernauts that are faster, smarter and more powerful than their predecessors. Even with Dr. Keel, Cathy Gale and Tara King on their side, can they once again defeat the insane genius who has given The Cybernauts new life and save the world?

I trust you see the main attraction this book had for me. For the first time, Steed is working with all his former partners on the same case. There are a couple of others that don’t appear here such as the nightclub singer Venus Smith and Dr. Martin King but they only appeared in a handful of episodes each and they’re nowhere nearly as well known. A lot of the enjoyment I got out of the story was seeing how Steed’s partners interacted and worked together. Tara King isn’t very happy about Mrs. Peel so obviously enjoying the adventure and working with Steed again. Dr. Keel and Cathy Gale discover that they’re quite the formidable team of brains and brawn. And it’s downright comforting and touching to see that Steed seems to be taking an almost fatherly pride in the way his former partners mesh their talents and skills together.

And I also liked how the book is set in period. There’s a part where Mrs. Peel and Tara are talking and Mrs. Peel makes a reference that it’s been a year since she and Steed’s partnership ended. So apparently Steed and Tara managed to get that spaceship they accidentally flew off in at the end of the final episode back to Earth. Being set in period gives the writers a chance to have fun with the technology, terminology and British eccentricity of the 1960’s. It’s also pretty funny at times, especially the scene where a poor Russian agent is harassed by one Avenger after another, all looking for information on Steed’s whereabouts. It’s also appropriately bizarre in the scenes where Cathy Gale battles a gorilla and where Steed and Mrs. Peel have to fight off Cybernauts disguised as flying stone angels in a graveyard.

So, should you read THE AVENGERS: TOO MANY TARGETS? Like I said, if you liked the TV series and you’re a fan then I don’t see why you wouldn’t want to. It’s a light, breezy read and the characterizations of Steed, Mrs. Peel and Tara are as I remember them. And even though I’m not familiar with Cathy or Dr. Keel, the writers sold me on them being worthy partners of Steed and just as deserving to be called Avengers. Well-written action scenes and you can’t beat a cyborg Neo-Nazi mad scientist with an army of killer robots as bad guys. It’s a fun read.

 

 

 

 

Kickin’ The Willy Bobo With…NICOLE GIVENS KURTZ

Derrick Ferguson: We’ve been through this before but no doubt there’s a lot of people who will be reading this who don’t know a thing about you so: Who Is Nicole Givens Kurtz? Where do you live and what do you do to keep the bill collectors away?

Nicole Givens Kurtz: I am originally from Knoxville, Tennessee (Go Big ORANGE!), but I currently reside just outside of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. I’m a public-school teacher by day, a writer at night and a mother 24/7.

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DF: It’s been a year and four months since I last interviewed you. What have you been doing since then?

NGK: So much has happened in the last year! An anthology I submitted a story to, was named as a Bram® Stoker Finalist in Horror Anthology (Sycorax’s Daughters), I’ve sold a few short stories, and finished a new urban fantasy series that I’m currently shopping around. I’ve also had the pleasure of attending BlackTasticon in June and some other pretty amazing events this year.

DF: I asked you in our last interview if there was an audience for Nicole Kurtz. Have you found your audience yet? Or have they found you?

NGK: Alas, my audience remains a bit elusive. I’m still working on refining my author brand, and also increasing my in-person presence. I write a lot of different types of stories, and for that reason, it may be difficult for me to find an audience that are “Nicole Givens Kurtz” fans, but rather they like specific things I write. For example, I do have “Cybil Lewis” readers, and “Minister Knight” readers, etc.

DF: How is Mocha Memoirs Press doing?

NGK: Mocha Memoirs is going through an overhaul in terms of direction. It’s not entirely new, but we are refining our model. Publishing is always changings and we’re shifting with the sands, too.

Our tagline is Bold. Fearless. Fiction. We want to continue to amplify marginalized voices in speculative fiction. We opened our submissions doors two months ago and are actively seeking novellas and novel-length submissions.

DF: What are you working on now?

NGK: Currently, I’m revising a romance novella for Falstaff Crush, the romance line of Falstaff books.  After that, I plan to finish revisions on my second urban fantasy series.  There are short stories and short story collections I’m also putting together, including on for Cybil Lewis and my weird western short stories.

DF: Who is Cybil Lewis?

NGK: Cybil Lewis is a private inspector in the future who investigates violations (crimes) for those who are afraid or don’t want to go to the police. She’s like a female Shaft in dystopian Washington, D.C., following her own moral compass, and getting the job done.  She’s by far my most personal and favorite character out of all of those that I have created over the last 20 years.

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DF: In the year since we’ve talked, has the prominence of female African-American Speculative Fiction writers grown? Diminished? Stayed the same?

NGK: It has exploded in the year since we talked! There are so many African-American Speculative Fictions writers that I struggle to keep up and to read others’ works! There’s just so much and that’s not a complaint! It’s so encouraging that younger African-American girls and boys and read books in speculative fiction with protagonists that look like them. They’re the heroes and heroines, the super powered people in those stories and that is beautiful.

DF: How do you see your role in the community of female AASF writers? IS there a community of female AASF writers? And if not, why isn’t there one?

NGK: There’s a community of AASF writers, but I don’t belong to an “official” one. I have a solid group of AASF authors who support each other, work together to network and share ideas, and push each other to be great. It’s something African Americans have always done, especially black women. We’ve taken care of things when we need to and for the community. Over the years, I have found and been gifted with really intelligent and brilliant AASF who may be further down the road in their career than me, but who reach back and mentor. Linda Addison does this as well as Tananarive Due and others.

DF: Who should we be reading these days? Who are you reading?

NGK: Right now, I’m reading Daniel Jose Older, Tomi Adeyemi’s, Eden Royce, and Sherrilyn Kenyon.  Everyone should be reading and supporting independent authors! My currently reading list has independently published authors on them, and honestly, I met some amazing authors at Blacktasticon. If you’re into comics, you should read Robert Jeffery’s Route One, and William Satterwhites’ Stealth.  There’s so much good reading being put out by small presses and independently published authors.

DF: How was Blacktasticon 2018? How much fun did you have?

NGK: Blacktasticon 2018 was a warm hug! It was mind-blowing, stimulating, and a huge creative bump for me. I did have to pinch myself several times as I sat on panels with my writing heroes. Sheree Renee Thomas, Linda Addison, John Jennings are the stars of black speculative fiction and I couldn’t believe how generous they were with their time, with their knowledge, and that was what really made the event for me. This community of individuals coming together to talk about speculative fiction through the lenses of Afro-centric beliefs, ideals, and historic context. I learned so much. My soul was fed. No other convention does that in the way that Blackstasticon did.

DF: For someone who hasn’t read any of your work, what should they start with and why?

NGK: For those who haven’t read any of my work, I would start with SILENCED, the first Cybil Lewis novel. It’s such a great story, and it’s a pretty good example of the types of stories I tend to tell. Of course, my writing has changed a lot over the years, but that’s the best representation of my writing style.

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DF: Where can people find out more about you and your work?

NGK: People can find me at Other Worlds Pulp, which is my website: http://www.nicolegivenskurtz.com, on Twitter at @nicolegkurtz or a facebook at https://www.facebook.com/NicoleGKurtz

DF: Anything else we need to know?

NGK: I’m giving away a free copy of my Cybil Lewis short story, “Recruited,” when people sign up for my newsletter. Interested parties can go here: https://nicolegivenskurtz.com/newsletter/

Thank you, Derrick for the interview. It is always a pleasure.

The Spirit of Wakanda

If you’re among those who saw BLACK PANTHER and loved it…

…and if you didn’t love it I’m not sure we can still be friends. But I digress…

…you’re probably salivating and looking forward to more adventures of King T’Challa and wondering how you’re going to fill your entertainment hours with more of the same. You desperately crave for more fantastic tales of black heroes and heroines to feed your stimulated imagination now that your creative juices are flowing and your soul seeks to enrich itself with legends and stories of heroes and heroines who can stand shoulder to shoulder with T’Challa, Princess Shuri, Nakia, Okoye and M’Baku.

Look no more.

There’s a legion of staggeringly creative black writers and artists that have been working like gubmint mules for years producing just those kinds of stories. Some of their names you know. Charles Saunders. Milton Davis. Balogun Ojetade. Gerald L. Coleman. Valjeanne Jeffers. Jeff Carroll. Nicole Givens Kurtz. Toi Thomas. Alicia MCalla. Thaddeus Howze. Brian W. Parker. Ronald T. Jones. Mshindo Kuumba. Jarvis Sheffield.

Some names you don’t. But that’s okay. There’s two places you should start to learn the names you’re not familiar with.

One is here: Black Science Fiction Society

And the other is here: The State Of Black Science Fiction

So now you don’t have to wait. Because there is more wonder and adventure out there than I think you didn’t know existed. And I envy you the discovery. Wakanda is not just a country. It is not just a warrior spirit and code. It is not just a technology. Although it embraces and celebrates all of these.

Wakanda is also a family of imagination. Because we can dream our future into reality.

And in this…we are all this day and forevermore citizens of Wakanda.

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“Wakanda will no longer watch from the shadows. We cannot. We must not. We will work to be an example of how we, as brothers and sisters on this earth, should treat each other. Now, more than ever, the illusions of division threaten our very existence. We all know the truth: more connects us than separates us. But in times of crisis the wise build bridges, while the foolish build barriers. We must find a way to look after one another, as if we were one single tribe.”

-King T’Challa, Sovereign of Wakanda

Derrick Ferguson Hires HUGH MONN, PRIVATE DETECTIVE

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The hard-boiled private eye genre is one I dearly love. The trench-coated shamus with a cigarette dangling from his lip, .45 automatic or .38 revolver in a well-worn shoulder holster, fedora pulled down low over his forehead, the faithful gum-chewing secretary and even more faithful fifth of scotch in the desk drawer. Using his experience of having lived a tough life and insight into human nature to solve mysteries, not fancy computers and DNA. it’s a genre I never get enough of.  And since television and movies have apparently abandoned the P.I. it’s up to writers like Lee Houston, Jr. and books like HUGH MONN, PRIVATE DETECTIVE to give me my fix.

Let me explain; even though Hugh Monn lives and works on the far distant planet of Frontera interacting with many different species and using advanced technology, the tone and feel of the character and the eight stories in the book are pure 1950’s.  Lee drops in a mention here and there of some bit of sci-fi such as a character having green or purple skin or Hugh’s weapon of choice being a Nuke 653 Rechargeable but that’s just throwaways Lee lobs at us once in a while to remind us that we’re not on Earth.  But he doesn’t go into any real detail as to how this future civilization operates or how the technology works.  When the subject of detective stories crossed with science fiction comes up, I usually mention Larry Niven’s stories and novels about Gil The Arm or Roger Zelazny’s “My Name Is Legion” since in those stories, the science fiction is integral to the story.  Take out the science fiction and you wouldn’t have a story.  Not so with Lee’s Hugh Monn stories.  They could easily have been set in 1950’s Los Angeles or New York with a little rewriting.  But I digress…let’s take HUGH MONN, PRIVATE DETECTIVE for what it is, not for what it isn’t.

Hugh Monn is a Human and yes, he freely admits to his clients that his name is a gag.  But one he prefers to use as he’s got some pretty big secrets in his past he’d prefer to keep to himself. As a detective, Hugh is capable, sharp, principled and dogged in his determination to solve his cases and get to the truth.  Hugh isn’t a pain-in-the-ass who rebels against authority and isn’t a lone wolf who doesn’t play by the rules.  Matter of fact, Hugh conducts himself as a total professional.  He doesn’t shoot when he doesn’t have to, he’s polite to everybody he meets and he co-operates with the authorities.  In particular, Lawbot 714 who he runs into in a couple of stories and who I wouldn’t mind seeing become a regular if Lee gives us more Hugh Monn cases.  He doesn’t smoke, doesn’t drink, he likes kids; he holds open the doors for old ladies.  I think you can tell where I’m going with this.  Hugh’s a fine detective but as a character I found myself wishing that once in a while he’d haul off and slug a suspect for no good reason other than he doesn’t like the fact the guy has eight eyes.  Hugh could stand to be a little rougher and not so polite.

The story “Shortages” is a good example of how Hugh Monn solves a case using his understanding of both humans and aliens and his powers of observation.  It also introduces the character of Big Louie, a Primoid.  Big Louie is the main suspect in a series of thefts being committed at a high security pier.  It’s a pretty good locked room mystery and the relationship between Hugh and Big Louie is the primary attraction in this story, as in “At What Price Gloria?”  Hugh and Big Louie have to rescue Big Louie’s wife Gloria and stop an assassination attempt.  I only wish more of the stories had been as suspenseful as this one.  In some of them, the mystery really isn’t that hard to figure out as there’s a lack of suspects so the solution comes down to either being this one or that one.  And I never got a sense of Hugh being in any real danger in any of these stories.  But Lee should be commended for trying different types of stories such as “For The Benefit of Master Tyke” which hinges more on the healing of a family than the solving of any real crime.  I picked up halfway through “Where Can I Get A Witness?” is intended as a homage to the 1944 film noir “Laura” and I enjoyed it until the very last paragraph where it felt to me as if the writer had stepped in to give his opinion of his own story and didn’t allow his character to do so.

So should you read HUGH MONN, PRIVATE DETECTIVE?  As this was his first book, I’m inclined to give Lee a pat on the back. There’s a lot to like in his writing style.  He does know how to keep a story moving but he shouldn’t shy away from rolling in the dirt and giving his characters some sharp edges. I wouldn’t mind seeing Hugh Monn tackle some more cases but I also wouldn’t mind seeing Lee Houston, Jr. strip away the political correctness and explore the real darkness of Frontera.

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Derrick Ferguson Dons Cape and Cowl To Review USED TO BE: THE KID RAPSCALLION STORY

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You know that old wheeze about as soon as a person comes into of a lot of money it changes them? I subscribe to a different theory. I think that acquiring a lot of money just makes you more of what you already are. If you were a generous, giving person before you became rich, chances are you’ll do more charity work with that money and help to make somebody’s world a little bit brighter. If you were an asshole before you became rich then the odds are that now that you have an AmEx Centurion card, you’re a raging asshole.

What has all this got to do with Mark Bosuquet’s superhero novel; USED TO BE: THE KID RAPSCALLION STORY? Because most of the characters in his novel follow this principal, I think. Their superpowers just make them more of what they already are. Take our POV character, Jason Kitmore aka Kid Rapscallion. Orphaned at an early age and adopted by the superhero Rapscallion to be his sidekick he’s sexually abused (and not by whom you’re thinking of either) and he takes designer drugs to enhance his physical abilities in order to be a proper superhero. Is it any wonder as an adult, out on his own and no longer just a sidekick he becomes hooked on cocaine and kinky sex? As I got deeper into the novel and more of Jason’s personality was explored and revealed I realized what Mark was doing. In the hands of a lesser writer he would have let Jason off the hook and skewed us into feeling sorry for Jason, leading us to think that Jason never had a chance in life. But I don’t think that such is the case. I think that Jason Kitmore would have been a mightily screwed up individual without the sexual abuse, the drugs or the superpowers. Such is the strength of the voice of that character.

And that is what pulled me through USED TO BE: THE KID RAPSCALLION STORY. The voices of the characters who are all so strong and so individual that I was actually hearing them in my head (that doesn’t happen nearly as much as it should when I’m reading a book these days) with their own inflections and distinctive speech patterns. And since the book takes us inside Mark’s superhero community and shows us the people behind the costumes and superpowers it’s important that we know who’s talking as soon as they speak. And there was never a point where I had to go back and re-read a paragraph because I was confused as to who was saying what to whom.

Sure, this being a modern-day superhero novel there is an abundance of profanity, sex and drug use. But Mark isn’t using it to shock. And most certainly if you’ve been reading comic books for the past twenty years then I don’t think there’s anything here that you already haven’t seen. And to be honest, he explores certain aspects of superpower enhanced sex I’ve always wondered about (oh, come on…like you haven’t thought what the sex life of Bouncing Boy and Duo Damsel or Mr. Fantastic and The Invisible Woman must be like) Especially the relationship between Kid Rapscallion and Duplication Girl which is…unique, to put it mildly.

Mark goes ahead and takes the risk of telling his story in the present tense and he jumps back and forth in time. I say risk because if you’re not willing to invest the time and let the story unfold the way it has to in order to get to where it and you has to go, then you’re going to get frustrated. And you shouldn’t. The disconnected chronology is the prose equivalent of how most people tell a story verbally. They jump around. They forget important points and have to go back to fill in those points. They emphasize and polish up their own behavior while misrepresenting the motives and behavior of others. Mark uses the technique quite well to build suspense at key points of the narrative, especially when the 9/11 terrorist attack happens and catches the superhero community totally by surprise and everybody scrambles around trying to cover their own asses.

Should you read USED TO BE: THE KID RAPSCALLION STORY? If you’ve read Mark Bosuquet’s other works then I don’t have to give you the hard sell. You know his talents as a writer and you know that he delivers a solid piece of entertainment every time he steps up. If you’ve never read anything by Mark before I’d actually recommend you try “The Haunting of Kraken Moor” first but that’s because it’s my favorite thing he’s written so far. And I think it’s a good way to ease you into Mark’s style and his approach to storytelling. But hey, if you’re a superhero fan (and aren’t all of us superhero fans by now?) then you certainly won’t be wasting your time or your money with USED TO BE: THE KID RAPSCALLION STORY.

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