Derrick Ferguson Saddles Up To Ride With U.S. MARSHAL BASS REEVES #1

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U.S. MARSHAL BASS REEVES #1

Allegiance Arts & Entertainment

Season 1/Episode 1: “No God West of Fort Smith”

Kevin Grevioux: Writer

David Williams: Artist

Kelsey Shannon: Colorist

Patrick Stiles: Editor

First off, can I say how good it was to hold an actual-to-Stan Lee Comic Book in my hands again? Most of my comic book reading of the last ten years or so has mostly been digital. Either on my Kindle or on my computer. I’ll re-read one of my graphic novels once in a while but this is the first single issue of any comic book I have held in my hands in ages. Just having that feeling of excitement and anticipation just before opening the cover come back to me again was worth reading U.S. MARSHAL BASS REEVES #1 for. That the story was well worth my time reading was an added bonus.

Wyatt Earp. Doc Holliday. Bat Masterson. Buffalo Bill. Charlie Siringo. Cole Younger. John Wesley Hardin. Wild Bill Hickok. These are names that we still remember and are renowned as legends of the Old West, the Wild West. The Wild West that has long since become as mythologized as the 1930’s of Doc Savage and The Shadow or Blaxploitation New York of the 1970s. Because their stories have been told and retold in novels, movies, comic books, radio dramas and TV shows until they’ve become integral threads in the great and grand tapestry of American Mythology. But where is Bass Reeves in this tapestry? Where are his comic books? His radio dramas? His movies? His TV shows?

Fortunately, Bass Reeves is become more and more well known by mainstream pop culture and his legend is enjoying the renown it deserves thanks to movies, print and television. And now we have a new comic featuring the great lawman to enjoy. And it’s a solid, entertaining beginning to what I hope will be a long run.

The various elements of Bass Reeves are well-highlighted in “No God West of Fort Smith.” We see him as feared bounty hunter, father/husband/family man and the start of his professional/personal relationship with Judge Isaac Parker, the infamous “Hanging Judge” of the Western District of Arkansas. Saying that the territory is lawless is an understatement. The Judge needs a new kind of lawman to tame this territory and he thinks Bass Reeves is it.

However, Bass has recently retired from bounty hunting and while he appreciates the offer, he’s made up his mind to settle down and raise his family in peace. Circumstances soon show Bass that in a land this savage and untamed, peace can only be maintained by strapping on his guns again.

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This is billed as Season 1/Episode 1 and indeed, it does have that feel of a pilot for a television series. Reading this I got the same vibe I do watching Classic TV Westerns of the 1960s and as I do so love those Westerns, that indeed is a good thing.

I only know Kevin Grevioux from the “Underworld” movie series and after reading this I need to seek out his other comic book work. He knows how to keep a story moving along at a nice clip and I liked his dialog, as to me, it does the things dialog is suppose to do: reveal character, provide information and keep the story moving. Now, dialog doesn’t have to do all of these things at the same time but to my mind, that’s what the best dialog does. I wasn’t crazy about Bass reciting his Biblical screed before committing mayhem as I was reminded way too much of the Bible passage Samuel L. Jackson’s character in “Pulp Fiction” would recite. But it’s something I can live with if used in future issues.

I greatly enjoyed the artwork of David Williams, especially the lean angular bodies of the figures. These aren’t people who sit around all day watching Netflix and bitching on Twitter. These are muscular people who live a hard life, working from sun-up to sun-down and their bodies reflect the life they lead. There’s one panel of Bass Reeves, having just received his badge and his commission with him looking down at the badge pinned to his vest with his wife standing behind him and the expression on their respective faces says more that any amount of dialog could. That is what I call artistry.

So should you read U.S. MARSHAL BASS REEVES #1? Absolutely. Those of us who have been into comics since who laid the rails know that Comic Books are way more than superheroes and are capable of telling stories in all genres. The Western has a long and respected history in this entertainment medium and I for one intend to continue the ride for as long as it goes. Enjoy.

 

There’s a 2019 Bass Reeves movie available on Amazon Prime: HELL ON THE BORDER. If you’re interested, you can find my review HERE.

Airship 27 has been publishing a prose anthology series about the legendary lawman: BASS REEVES, FRONTIER MARSHAL all of which are available via Amazon as paperback, ebook or audiobook.

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Airship 27 Productions Launches Two Charles Saunders Series

Since his arrival on the fantasy adventure scene back in the 70s, Charles Saunders has been recognized as one of the most successful African American writers in the field today. His action/adventure hero Imaro has been featured in a half dozen novels all of which went on to inspire generations of young black authors.

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In 2011 Saunders wrote “Damballa” the first ever black pulp hero for Airship 27 Productions. Operating out of Harlem in the 1930s, Damballa employs unique African magic to battle gangsters and crooked politicians. Two years later Saunders introduced the Jungle Witch Luluma in his short story “Mtimu” which appeared in the Pro Se Production’s bestselling anthology, “Black Pulp.” At the start of the tale, the beautiful Luluma is a servant of a villainous hunter but by the story’s end she realizes his true nature and regains her independence thanks to the hero, Mtimu. Atypical of Saunders talent, she is a powerful character worthy of her own series.

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Now Airship 27 Productions is proud to announce their creation of two new on-going book series, “Charles Saunders presents Damballa” and “Charles Saunders presents Luluma.” Managing Editor Ron Fortier elaborates. “In recent years, Charles Saunders has been extremely busy working on a truly unique black fantasy saga. So much so that it became impossible for him to devote any time to his other creations. When we suggested the possibilities of continuing both Damballa and Luluma with other writers, he was very excited about the concept and gave us his approval. Have no fear, he will be overseeing each series as they progress.”

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Writing the first ever Lulama novel will be writer/publisher Milton Davis of MVmedia LLC. “I’ve known Charles Saunders for eleven years and had the privilege to work with him on a number of projects. I’m excited to have the opportunity to develop a novel based on one of his characters. It’s a dream come true.”

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While Pulp Factory Award winning writer Derrick Ferguson will write the all new Damaballa adventure.  “One the things that has always overwhelmed me in my New Pulp career is that I have gotten to meet with so many professionals whose work I have enjoyed and to my utter astonishment and joy I have found myself embraced and welcomed as a fellow professional.

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“To say that I am honored to be given the opportunity to write a character created by Charles Saunders with his blessing is truly an understatement. Charles Saunders is one of the reasons I am writing today and to be working with him is an opportunity I never would have dreamed could have taken place. I pray that I do justice to the magnificent character of Damballa.”

At present there is no specific time set for the release of these new books. “Our plan is to move forward with full length novels first,” Fortier continues. “Later, if there is an interest, we may also produce anthologies featuring both Damballa and Lulama. We’ll leave that up to our network of pulp writers and the response of our readers. We see some truly amazing possibilities in the future for both characters and are greatly indebted to Charles’s faith in us.”

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AIRSHIP 27 PRODUCTIONS – PULP FICTION FOR A NEW GENERATION!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dispatches From Windy City #1

Whenever I’ve talked about trips I’ve taken in the past (especially to Florida) you’ve usually heard me talk about driving down there. And driving is usually how I do travel. I’ve driven down to Florida and back to Brooklyn at least a dozen times. Which has led some people to think that I don’t like to fly or am scared to fly. Actually, I’m not. I’ve flown many times in the past. Flying’s cool. I just prefer driving because I like to take my time to get to where I’m going and I like to run on my own schedule. I start taking planes and bam! everything is out of my hands. I gotta be here at this time and I gotta do this and I gotta do that. All of a sudden, it’s as if all the fun has gone out of travelling because now it’s more about meeting schedules that others have set for me rather than me just jumping in my car and going wherever I please and doing whatever I want.

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So why did I jump on a plane and come to Chicago for the 2019 Windy City Pulp & Paper Convention?

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Simple. I thought it would be fun and there were people here I hadn’t seen in awhile and I wanted to see again.

Such as Ron Fortier and Rob Davis, the Captain and Chief Engineer of Airship 27. I haven’t seen these cats since the first Pulp Ark many moons ago and it was high time I hung out with them again.

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And I never pass up a chance to harass Tommy Hancock. I’ve been doing it for twenty years. Why should I stop now?

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And doubtless there are many more people I will resume an acquaintance with here and those I will meet for the first time. And that’s really what it’s about, isn’t it? Or at least it should be. It most certainly is for me. Making connections. Meeting new people. Renewing friendships with fellow writers, colleagues and enthusiasts of Pulp, be it Classic or New.  Talking about the things we love in Pulp and how we can make it better and how we can expand the audience and share it with the world.

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I’ll be here in Chicago at the Windy City Pulp & Paper Convention this weekend so get used to seeing these dispatches for the next couple of days. Like those war correspondents you see in those old Black & White WWII movies who went out on the front lines during the day and then at night filed stories about what they had heard and seen? Yeah, this will be kinda like that. You guys know how I be.

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Tommy and I have already talked about major Dillon and Fortune McCall stuff. Ron and Tommy are going to be making major announcements tomorrow as Friday is the actual day this shindig starts. We just got here early because there’s a whole LOT of stuff that has to go on behind the scenes before the jump-off jumps off. I may even do a Facebook Live from the floor of the convention. Anything to show you guys how much fun we’re having.

We haven’t even really gotten started yet and we’re already having a ball.

Watch this space.

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I Saw The Future At Windy City Pulp Con by Len Levinson

Born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, Len Levinson served on active duty in the U.S. Army from 1954-1957, and graduated from Michigan State University with a BA in Social Science. He relocated to NYC that year and worked as an advertising copywriter and public relations executive before becoming a full-time novelist.

Len created and wrote a number of series, including the Apache Wars Saga, The Pecos Kid, and The Rat Bastards. He has had over 80 titles published.

After many years in NYC, he moved to a small town (pop. 3100) in rural Illinois, surrounded by corn and soybean fields, a peaceful, ideal location for a writer.

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I live in a small town (population 3000) way out here on the great American prairie. Therefore I have little contact with the wider world of publishing although I’ve written 83 published novels to date.
Last Sunday (4/23) I attended the Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention in a Chicago suburb called Lombard, and became aware of the future of fiction publishing. Many of you probably have come to this awareness already, but it was a major revelation for me.
I realized that there is a huge, growing indie publishing movement fully underway, and has come into being because traditional publishing has narrowly focused on conventional “safe” fiction, and tends to reject anything new, weird, crazy or bizarre.
This policy has left a huge vacuum now being filled by the new indie press which operates under a different business model. They don’t have offices in Rockefeller Centre in NYC like Simon and Shuster. They operate out of home offices, barns, or other low-cost spaces. Everything is handled over the internet. And they don’t pay advanced. Authors receive royalties only, as in the early days of publishing. And they produce GREAT eye-catching covers that are works of art on their own.
During the convention I spoke with Ron Fortier, publisher and editor-in-chief of one of the larger indie publishers, Airship 27. He said that famous authors sometimes call him about books of theirs that were rejected by their usual publishers, because those books were considered too far out. But nothing is too far out for today’s indie publishers who market, among other items, novels about vampire cowboys, lesbian werewolves from Mars, hard boiled crime-fiction, other action-adventure novels including traditional Westerns, and all kinds of sci-fi, fantasy and sword and sandal fiction. They also publish new novels about characters in the public domain such as Sherlock Holmes. It’s called “the New Pulp Movement.”
I also spoke with Tommy Hancock, Editor in Chief of Pro Se Productions, which is also a major indie publisher marketing hundreds of titles. He told me that the big five publishers are buying up some indie publishers, because they can see where the business is going. But Tommy isn’t interested in selling out. His main interest is exciting new fiction.
Evidently there’s a whole new publishing world out there of which I was unaware, although some of my old books have been republished by indie publishers such as Piccadilly, Destroyer and Blackstone. But I never realized how important this New Pulp Movement is becoming. It is wildly creative, fully energized and intensely ambitious, the new kid on the block fighting for a bigger slice of the pie. The welcome result is more choices for readers and hopefully more income for writers.